PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

VISIT OUR NEW SUPPORT PORTAL
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 3      Prev   1   2   3   Next
kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #16 
Hey, don't thank me until you see the goods!! now the pressure is on 
__________________
Dmolished = Egads
kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #17 
OK, here it is.

I started out with the intention of including only guitar-friendly voicings but my tendency (and Ted's influence) of trying to be coherent and organized pushed me to reduce the parameters as much as possible so I could be more thorough. 

So, some important points:

1. These are only 1-3 (root and 3rd) voice exchanges. I didn't put any 3-5, 5-7 etc.

2. It only shows Diatonic voice exchange (non-chromatic).

3. I avoided all sretches beyond 5 frets (with one 7-fret V.1 exception)

4. All the chords are A7. As mentioned on the sheet, One can, and should, try using the same voicings with other types of chords. It will work. 

5. All examples can be played backwards or forwards.

6. The middle "chord" in each example isn't "necessary", and definately shouldn't be analyzed (as far as function) as it is just a result of voice leading.

7 Open strings were avoided so that all examples can be played in different keys and positions.

8. Many of the examples can be fingered in different ways than how I indicated. I tried staying in the same general position. But the ones that don't take up all 6 strings (voicing groups 1 through 5)  can be played going up (or down) the neck.

9. The voicing groups that are indicated by "?" aren't included in Paul's list of Ted's  first 10 voicing groups.

10. I didn't include any examples that had voicings "crossing" (voicings in the same octave that overlap and come back to the same exact chord on which they started (like palindromes).

11 These are all 4-note voicings. 3-note voicing are also possible and satisfactory (not to mention easier to play). Also 4-note contracting into 3-note is possible for all the crazy stretching examples that weren't included. This subject could be expanded upon at a later date.


Ok, enjoy   If anybody has any questions, comments, or finds a mistake, or comes up with any that aren't included (using the same parameters), please don't hesitate to speak up. If people are interested I can continue with either other examples using other voice exchanges (3-5, 5-7 etc) and/or chromatic voice exchange.

Mike

Attached Images
jpeg Voice_Exchange1-3.jpeg (803.93 KB, 105 views)


__________________
Dmolished = Egads

sonnyintervals

Registered:
Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #18 
Great stuff, Mike. Also, thanks for including the voicing group info. 

Steve.
spideyguy

Registered:
Posts: 35
Reply with quote  #19 
Wow thanks for all this! I better get to work!!
bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #20 
These are really nice, Mike (and some are a bit challenging!).  Thanks for putting them down on paper for us.

I wanted to throw this example out there of what is called an "Omnibus," which is a chromatic version of the 1 to 3 voice exchange on a dominant 7th chord.  It's the same as your example, but with the whole steps between 1 and 2 and 2 and 3 filled in.  Did Ted ever introduce this to anyone?

Attached Images
jpeg Omnibus.jpg (57.91 KB, 75 views)


__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ

kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #21 
Ah David, you jumped the gun I was going to do that as soon as I introduced chromatic voice exchange. You ruined one of my show stoppers  . We must have been taught in the same manner, since my teachers also referred to it as an "Omnibus" though i've never seen it written in a textbook with that name.

and since we're talking about it, we might as well say that it can be applied to every example on the sheet i made, not just necessarily  the first.

__________________
Dmolished = Egads
bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #22 
Ah, man, I'm sorry.  I didn't know you had a plan.
__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #23 
ha ha Don't worry about it, this is a forum not a dissertation hall. It's just that that one is one of  the show stoppers in terms of voice exchange  
__________________
Dmolished = Egads
theodoregeisel

Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #24 
I've not seen it in text either, but it's out there.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnibus_progression
bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #25 
The use of the term "omnibus" for this voice-exchange pattern may have originated in a presentation at a conference in 1972 by the musicologist Victor Yellin.  And it is referred to by this name in Mark DeVoto's 1987 revised edition (5th) of Walter Piston's "Harmony."  A quick internet search shows that Yellin eventually published a book titled "The Omnibus Idea" in 1998.  But I've never had a chance to look it over.
__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
theodoregeisel

Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #26 
Great topic. You are quite correct. My searches keep coming up with Yellin and Tedesco (not Tommy). Though I did find this Cutler site with pdf's and mp3's of this "mechanism" as GVE would have probably called it. I guess if I'm gonna steal some ideas I might as well look to the masters. Click on Chapter 18 for the list.
http://www.musictheoryexamples.com/index.html
Barry
p.s. Kontiki, this is all your fault. lol
kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #27 
and here i was gonna pace the issue....

just keep in mind that these kind of voice-exchange things (including the omnibus) are infinitely easier to play on piano than guitar. especially more than 3 voices. therefore it's a good idea to find a few on guitar that work for you.

__________________
Dmolished = Egads
bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #28 
Right...I think I may have hurt myself trying to play some of these!

Some composers actually strung together fragments of a number of different omnibus patterns to get even longer chromatic wedge-type progressions.  Anyone interested in seeing some?

__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
theodoregeisel

Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #29 
Sure would. Seems like another way to create movement and interest. Playing a 7 string classical with a 3 1/8" nut as my main instrument, I have some pain today. Yeah it seems one can break the wedge at any given time for one's purposes. I have found some good uses on alt chords based off of the melodic minor.
bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
I have found some good uses on alt chords based off of the melodic minor.

Well, good doctor, by all means let us in on what you've found!

Mike, do you have some good examples of extended omnibus progressions?

__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE