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Bob

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was talking with Barbara the other day about my time studying with Ted. Besides the fun that I had being in Ted's company, I enjoyed his approach to learning music and the guitar. Ted had a wonderful way of taking a subject like "Tone Rows," featured in the June newsletter, and incorporating other areas of study such as harmony, close voiced chord forms, harmonic colors for style -- to name a few.

The attached sheet is just a small example of the suggestions that Ted would make when he handed out sheets like these. To those of you who never had a chance to study with Ted, I hope it inspires you to look at the exercises in the forum in a broad way. Like Ted would say, "be a scientist."

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gif Tone_Rows_c.GIF (116.16 KB, 274 views)


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Bob Holt

Bob

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Reply with quote  #2 
A couple of quick edit notes.
 1. In step 3 the F# dorian scale should have started on on string five and said C#, D#, and E.
 2. In step 3 the highest note in the  Type 3 scale fragment should have been a natural 5 not a b5. Although it does sound goooooood !
I'll try to get a clean example page up soon. Sorry for the errors.  

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Bob Holt
Bob

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Reply with quote  #3 
The example page should be error free now. If you catch something I missed please let me know. Thanks, Bob

P.S. The basic fingering on the Type 3 dominant scale is,
finger:  1134  23  123  124
string:  5       4    3     2


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Bob Holt
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks so much Bob! I can hear Ted saying all those things. Especially"Be a scientist"

There is so benefit for everyone in the work you have done. I truly appreciate that you've put the time and energy into this study to share with all. Wonderful. B.

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Barbara Franklin
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks Bob...good stuff!
--Paul

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--Paul
bishopdm

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Folks:

I hate to appear slow on the uptake, but to what are you referring when you use the term "tone rows."

David Bishop
Tucson, AZ

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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
Bob

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Reply with quote  #7 
I was asked that same question just the other night. Without having more information I can't say why Ted didn't refer to these as arpeggios. What the page has are two rows. The first row contains a 3rd,#5th, Root and #9th. The second row has a b7,b9,3 #5. Back in the day when a few of us were at Dick Grove's School (hi Mark,hi Nick!), these rows would have been called assumed roots. The first row would have yielded a D#ma7#5/B and the second would have been an Ami7b5/B. I think some of the Berklee guys and girls still do it that way. I know that Ted did not like the assumed root way of thinking. "I'm on this chord so I gonna play this other chord" sounded too cumbersome to Ted.
 So why Tone rows and not just arpeggios or assumed roots? My guess is that Ted was leaving his options open for rows that were not stacked thirds. I'm sure there are other reasons but that's my best guess.
P.S. Doug, thanks for the e-mail.

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Bob Holt

rafikenn

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Reply with quote  #8 
you'll notice the shapes built on the 3rd & 7th degree of the altered dominant
are the some shapes reversed on the Lydian flat 7 sound.that is because
these scales are the hypo[from the middle] versions of each other.altered starts dim,whole tone,lydienb7 spells wholetone,diminished.hence the sub5 principle.also a hugely important subject for guitar,which Ted invested much time to outline on his single line books,is moving the some shape,up&down the fretboard.the next shape[is not on these papers] envoles 2 adjacent strings,it's very practical for reasons you'll discover.13,24,works great for
some arpeggios.you can use this 2 arpeggios on other sounds too,experiment.

 

 

Bob

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Rafikenn,
 I think I see where you're coming from: the plurality between the B7#5,b9,#9 chord (V7 of I) and the 1/2 step approach chord F9,#11,13.

B7alt= type 4 dominant=melodic minor scale from the b9 of the chord.

B7b5#5b9#9=   C    D    Eb    F     G    A    B 
                      b9   #9   3rd   b5   #5   b7   R         R=chord root

F9,#11,13= Overtone Dominant Scale= melodic minor scale from the 5th.

F9,#11,13= C      D       Eb    F    G      A      B
                5th   13th    b7   R    9th   3rd  #11

Ted's nomenclature may be new to some of you even if these principles are not.

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Bob Holt
Bob

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Rafikenn,
 I re-read your post and I think I missed something you were saying about the axis of the 7 and 3. I believe what your saying is that when  you have tri-tone substitutes like we have in these examples, where the tone rows are built off the 3rd and off the b7 of the V7 of I (B7alt), they invert when applied to the 1/2 step approach chord (F9#11,13). Such as:

B7alt= D#ma7#5 from the 3rd of the chord and Ami7b5 from the b7th of the chord.

F9#11,13= Ami7b5 from the 3rd of the chord and D# or (Eb) ma7#5 from the b7th of the chord.

Is this what you mean?
                                  

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Bob Holt
rafikenn

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Reply with quote  #11 
yes Bob,that's exactly what i meant.you sound like a great teacher,
in the spirit of Ted,who is the Platonic teacher for many evers to come..
Bob

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Reply with quote  #12 

Rafikenn, you are very kind. Ted used to say that we all stand on someone else's shoulders. In the study of music and guitar I gratefully stand on the shoulders of my teachers.


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Bob Holt
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