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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi guys,
I wanted to post this compilation page here in the Forums first before going to the "From Students" section because it is easier to make corrections to little typos here.  Once the compilations are moved it is difficult to make changes.
This is a complicated arrangement, and I decided to add notation in addition to the lead sheet and Ted's grid diagrams.  The notation may be considered the basic notation, but you really need to color it to give it some "life" as mentioned in the comments below.  I'm hoping that you'll please let me know if you spot any typos or anything that should be adjusted.  I expect some detailed comments about anything amiss from Eagle-eyed Charles (lawyercharlesm) and the rest of you Ted fans.  I appreciate your feedback.  (Sorry for adding so many long-winded comments below...I'm not really sure how helpful or necessary they are.  I kind-of think that most guitarists who play through Ted's arrangements can probably figure this stuff out on their own.)

Georgia on My Mind
Ted Greene Arrangement December 3, 1984

This is a pretty difficult arrangement, but if you make a few adjustments according to your ability, you can play this piece with a little practice.  Below I’ve made a few suggestions for easier voicings of the more difficult passages.  You may need to make additional modifications if some of Ted’s chords present too many challenges.  Remember that this song sounds best with a slow, relaxed groove, so don’t hamper that with chords that are impossible for you to play at this point. 

At the top of the page Ted wrote: “Solo Guitar Outline – The word outline is used because you have to add at least Rt. hand delays or rolls to fill up the holes.”  Ted expected the player to apply techniques in order to fill-in or color the “holes” or spots where the harmony sustains for 2 beats or more.  “Delays” are when you separate the voicings in a chord and play one part, then the other.  You might think of this as the melody part and the harmony part playing independently.  “Rolls” refers to arpeggios or arpeggiated chords.  You can also do short little bass runs between chords if there is enough time. 

Some comments and fingering suggestions:

P.1:      For the first chord Ted intended that the little finger play the E on the 2nd string and then bend backwards to play the A melody note on the 1st string.  Ted was amazing in his ability to bend his 4th finger backwards for barring without moving the other fingers.  If you find this move difficult here (as I do), you may have  to simply lift the 4th finger off the 2nd string and play the A note.  You may also wish to play the F#7 chord on the 3rd beat of the measure, delayed from the melody.

P.1, line 1:        You may want to add the optional A melody note to the Am9 chord (not included on Ted’s chord diagram), this is part of the melody of the song, and I’ve include the note in parentheses. 

P.1, line 2:        You might find it easier to play the C9 on strings 5,4,3,2 instead.  Use the same notes, but in the first position of the guitar.  It seems to flow better here, and you can add a short descending bass line from the D of the G6 chord to the C of the C9 chord (D – Db – C).

P.1, line 3:        You may wish to add the optional B melody note to the B13 chord (not included on Ted’s chord diagram). If so, finger the B13 as: 1, 1, 2, 3, 4 and then simply lift the 4th finger for the B note.

P.3, line 2:        Finger the G7#11 chord as:  2,4,2,3,1,open.  If this is too difficult, then just drop the 5th (D) on string 5.

P.3, line 2:        Finger the Em6 – F#+/#9 chords as follows:  open,1,4  to  3,1,4,2.  Do a little slide with the 4th finger for the C# – D melody line.

P.3, line 3:        The Em7/11 is a difficult voicing, especially with the moving line on the top string.  You may wish to re-voice that chord as follows:  R, 5, R, b3, b7, R to make it a little easier.

P.4, line 1:        The Bm – G – E – Em9 – Bm7 move is pretty slick.  Finger it as: 

3,1,1  to  3,1,4  to  3,2,4,1 to  3,1,4,4  to  3,1,4,4,2

When it comes to the move of the E to the Em9, Ted employs the used of his flexible 4th finger to barre the 3rd and 2nd strings while sustaining the 6th and the 3rd strings.  If you can do this, great…if not, you just have to lift the fingers here.

Now, from that Em9 chord, Ted goes to the Bm7 chord while keeping the fingers in position on strings 6, 3, and 2.  The movement is just on the 4th string, moving the 1st finger down a ½ step.  Very nice, but difficult.  If this is too difficult, you may wish to voice that chord with a barre on the 7th position as follows:  R,5,b3,b7, then lift the b7 to get the F# note on the 2nd string.

P.4, line 2:        Finger the G#m7/11 – C#9 – C#7b9 as follows: 1,2,1,3,4  to  3,3,2,1,4  to  3,4,1,1.  Try to sustain that top C# note with the 4th finger when moving from the G#m7/11 to the C#9 chord.  If playing the C#9 chord with a 3rd finger barre on strings 6 and 4 is too difficult, then you may choose to finger that C#9 – C#7b9 move as:  T,3,2,1,4  to  T,3,1,1.  Ted found it easy for him to use his 3rd finger as a barre, so he probably didn’t use the thumb here.

P.4, line 3:        The Bb9 – E7/6 is a long stretch!  See page 6 of the compilation for my optional alternate voicings for that passage (which retains most of Ted’s notes).

P.5, line 1:        Finger the F\9 as 1,2,4,2.

P.5, line 1:        The fingering that Ted wrote for the C7sus4 – Fmaj7 – Fm7 diagram seems to indicate that he intended that the C bass note is sustained throughout the inner-voice movement.  This is pretty difficult and awkward.  If you can do this, that’s great.  If not, then fingering the C7sus4 chord with a barred 8th fret, and then just move the X and square notes without the sustained C bass.

P.5, line 1:        The Ebm11 – Dm9 move is rather difficult.  It’s just a quick ½-step type of thing.  Ted seemed to relish these kinds of close-voiced chord moves, and he played them well.  I play this passage by eliminating the lowest note for each chord to make it more doable.  Also, put a little slide on it for color.

P.5, line 2:        For the D7#9 – G7/6 – C7#9 – F7/6 move, notice that the lowest three notes are descending chromatically.  This is easy.  Finger this as:  1,2,2,2  to  1,2,2,3  to  1,2,2,3  to  1,2,2,4.

P.5, line 2:        Ted plays an F note as the melody for the lyric “find” for the phrase, “…no peace I find…”, whereas the given melody of the song is actually a G note.  If you want to play the G note, then instead of the Bb9, play a Bb6 chord (see the voicing of the G6 chord on p.1, line 2).  If you do play Ted’s Bb9 chord here, then in order to get the C to C# moving line, lay your 3rd finger down to get the 3rd string.

P.5, line 3:        The melody on the G7sus4 chord as given by Ted is F to D.  However, the given melody of the song is actually Bb to D.  If you want to play this, then use the same chord but move the little finger from the 2nd string to the 1st string.

P.6:                  For the smoothest fingering of the last five chords, try this:
                        2,3,4  to  3,2,4  to  3,2,4  to  3,2,4  to 3,2,4,1

Hope this helps in learning to play this arrangement.
Enjoy!
--Paul

The files for the compilation pages have been moved to:
http://www.tedgreene.com/fromstudents/GeorgiaOnMyMind.asp


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omobob

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Posts: 111
Reply with quote  #2 
I appreciate and enjoy your "many long-winded comments"...  I cut and paste them into a new document to save along with the compilation pages.
earsoup

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Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #3 
Paul you're the man !
thanks
LeonWhite

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Reply with quote  #4 
Paul I always save your comments.  Silly not to, really as who has spent more time with the arrangement and notation?  Thank you so much for your efforts - so totally in the spirit of Ted. Happy Holidays.
Thanks
Leon
MichaelKeller

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks Paul!
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #6 
Has anyone here learned this arrangement?
--Paul


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pbellora

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Posts: 57
Reply with quote  #7 
Paul, hello!
Having the rhythm written for this arrangement is truly helpful. I truly appreciate the time in effort you have put into this. I have learned the piece but I still have to achieve the fluency that I think is need for this song... of course I'm already using a few alternate chords/fingerings!

Greetings from Argentina, South America.
Regards,


Pedro



PaulV

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Posts: 1,773
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Pedro!
Glad to know that Ted's music is reaching all over the world.  Yeah, I also use some alternate chords in a couple of places on this song.  It seemed that Ted's fingers could do just about anything...but I still have a long way to go....

Just curious....do you think that having TAB would be helpful in this arrangement (and other chord-melody compilations), or is the notation and Ted's chord diagrams sufficient for you?
Thanks for the feedback.
--Paul


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pbellora

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Posts: 57
Reply with quote  #9 
Paul,
thanks for your reply!

I don't think TAB is necessary. Maybe it's not even necessary to have the notes for the chords, as this can be marked with some "x" notes underneath (just to say, "here comes the chord with the rounded solid dots"). This would mean that only lead notes would actually be marked. What I found truly useful is having the rhythm of the chord and the rhythm of the following notes (the ones following the solid rounded points, such as the "x" and the squares). The lyrics line is also helpful, specially when Ted moves away from the standard melody; for example, during the modulation.

Thanks again for providing this wonderful insight!
Regards,


P




Masemm

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Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Paul
The aspects of your work I find most helpfull are the rhythm & timing of the chords in relationship to the melody and the lyrics which help me learn the tune.  I do not know some of the tunes so this really makes it easier.  I think that having a few songs on the site in Tab is good for people starting out with this material but not necessary when you get used to the chord diagrams.  We should encourage people to develop their own unique approach to the tune using Ted's chords as the foundation and a goal to achieve.  I really enjoy learning the tunes this way because it is more flexible and I can add my own style to it. 

The only thing I would add to your work is an audio file of the song.  I have the same problem with playing Ted's chords - some are quite difficult to play smoothly.  This may discourage us from making audio files but there is no shame in substituting an easier chord - this is jazz afterall and we are allowed some flexibility in how we play.
Please keep up your great work!!
Regards
Michael

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jebdiesel

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Reply with quote  #11 

   The site is great, thanks for all you do. I would vote for no tab. Putting things into Ted chord grids is plenty enough. Tab for me is cheap, and I would steer away from any page that had it. I completely stopped reading guitar mags over 10 years ago because I felt they hindered my learning... I was right. Ted didn't use tab it seems , so I vote to keep it pure. I have navigated several of Ted's original sheets and know when a melody note is not written, because these are all my favorite tunes and I play most of them already in a simpler way. The grids and attached lead sheets are really cool though ,and you guys have done an awesome job.

       I was asking around  for Ted in 2004 and no one seemed to know a thing. His passing was so sad. Many have become aware of his genius since. I started stumbling my way through Chord Chemistry 20 years ago....still learning.

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hey Jeb,
I totally agree with you about Tab.  I'm not into it, but I have provided it on a couple of my compilation pages, especially the single-line studies, partially on request, partially because I thought it might make it more accessible to those who like Tab.  But I think you're right that if someone embraces Ted's grid method then Tab is unnecessary.
So I'll just continue with notation and Ted's diagrams.
Thanks for your comments.
--Paul


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jebdiesel

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #13 
    Oh well what you did with the "uptown blues" lesson, for example, is absolutely perfect, thanks. I'll print it out tonight. Let me recover from Christmas spending and I will contribute some coins later this month. The work is much appreciated. The single note lessons in standard notation can be hard, but reading traditional music has some real big payoffs. It's not hard, you just have to do it all the time. Of course you guys know that..............
LeonWhite

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Posts: 455
Reply with quote  #14 
Ted didn't use it, it will take more time from you, and it clutters up the page.  I think your presentation is superb.  Seeing an occasional note on a staff won't hurt anybody.
Leon
PaulV

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Posts: 1,773
Reply with quote  #15 
Just an update on this arrangement: You can now find the files posted in the "From Students" section of the TedGreene.com site.
Here:  http://www.tedgreene.com/fromstudents/GeorgiaOnMyMind.asp
Hope it has helped a little.
Thanks for you comments. 
--Paul


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