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leftygtr

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Reply with quote  #1 
So which composers besides Bach did he study and incorporate?
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Leftygtr!  Ted studied SO MANY! Okay,  most of the 19th century impressionists and romantics, e.g. Chopin, Debussy, Ravel, Faure, Saint Saens. were the main ones.  Then there was George Gershwin, one of his all-time favorites!  And film composers such as Max Steiner (another big  favorite),  and Hugo Friedhofer (sp.?), Dimitry Tiompkin,  Korngold. 

This is basically a sampling of favorites but you can really hear the influence of the French composers, Gershwin and Max Steiner in a lot of Ted's chord use and choices, and in some of Ted's improvisations. 

Ted studied and read about every composer from Palestrina to Paul McCartney. Ted always found something fascinating and learned a thing or two about  almost every composer you can think of. 

His interest in rock a roll ended in the 1970s with maybe a few exceptions, and although Ted studied a few modern composers, such as Schoenberg and the twelve tone method, he was more curious than actually finding the sounds pleasing to listen to. 

Ted also loved Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Schubert, Mahler, et alia, you won't hear much of their influence in Ted's playing that we have left to us.  However there were many evenings when we'd be listening to say, Mahler, and then Ted would be so inspired and go off on a fantasy improvisation ala Mahler! 

Anyway Lefty, that will hopefully give you some idea? yes?  Barbara


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Barbara Franklin
Deparko

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Reply with quote  #3 
I remember Ted calling J.S. "The Big Guy"...Ted was a Bachaholic (like a lot of us) :-)
kontiki

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Reply with quote  #4 
Did Ted ever mention Duruflé?
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barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Mike,  Not that I recall, and the name is not familiar to me.  If Ted discovered a composer's work that he loved he would always share that with me.  We did discover Vincent d'Indy together. Mike, there are so many fine but lesser known composers, as you probably know, and the usual way we came upon them was listening to the classical radio station - so potluck!  
Also, we didn't have youtube then, yes, Ted never watched youtube!  But I will listen to Durufle (how did you put an accent over the e?)  Which piece would you recommend?   Barbara


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Barbara Franklin
kontiki

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Reply with quote  #6 
Barbara,
 I'm sure Ted (and you) would have loved Duruflé. The best way to describe him is: Debussy/Ravel meets Gregorian chant. His harmonies are just gorgeous and lush, and he uses it to harmonize Gregorian melodies. He didn't write a whole lot, but what he did is breathtaking (for me at least) I would start with either the Requiem Op.9 or the Messe "com jubilo" Op.11. The Requiem is by far his most known work and therefore I suggest anybody start there. I hope you get a good recording. 

P.S. I'm able to type "é" because I'm living in France and therefore have an AZERTY keyboard.  By the way, If any of you Ted lovers come to Paris, let me know, I'll buy you a drink and be your guide around town

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bishopdm

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Reply with quote  #7 
I would like to add that Duruflé's "Ubi Caritas" is sublime!!!  I've sung it many times and it always gives me chills.  It's a short piece, but oh so worth it.
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David Bishop
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barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #8 
I listened to Durufle last evening, oh! breathtakingly beautiful!  Both pieces Ubi Caritas (I chose a slower version) and the Requiem Opus 9 (choir with orchestra) brought me to tears.
There is no doubt in my mind and heart that Ted would have loved these pieces. If he'd discovered Durufle, he would have come flying over here with the CD saying, "Barb, you have to listen to this! you're gonna love it!" Oh how I wish Ted and I could share this now.  
Much thanks to you both, Mike and David for this (yes, sublime) musical gift.


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Barbara Franklin
James

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Posts: 333
Reply with quote  #9 
If anyone who lives in the Los Angeles area is interesting in hearing the organ music of Maurice Durufle, there is an upcoming, free concert series of all his works for organ.  It's at :

First Congregational Church of Los Angeles
540 S Commonwealth Ave
Los Angeles, California 90020-1298
213-385-1341
http://www.FCCLA.org

which has one of the largest pipe organs in the world.  The series begins this Thursday, February 14, 2013 with a lecture at 11:00am by Stewart Foster, Organist-in-Residence.  The concert will then begin at 12:10pm.  The series runs each Thursday through March 28, and a performance schedule can be found on their website at http://www.fccla.org.  They put out a basket for donations but, if your conscience allows, you can attend for free.


I've heard Stewart Foster play there many times and he is great.  If you like classical organ music, his ongoing free mid-day Thursday concerts are performance gems, not widely known, mostly attended by a few dozen grey-haired folks.
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