PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

VISIT OUR NEW SUPPORT PORTAL
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
andybrown

Registered:
Posts: 71
Reply with quote  #1 

One of the things that blows me away about Ted was his unbelievable output. Where the heck did he find the time to get all this stuff together? Every new sheet that is posted, every new video or audio clip I see of him just deepens my awe at the AMOUNT of music he was able to cover. Obviously he must have been very organized at some level to cover so much ground. How did he find the time to do it with all his teaching, etc? Was he pretty structured with his time? Any insight into this would be appreciated...

YoungBlood

Registered:
Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #2 

I think a lot of the sheets he made while teaching his students, and maybe he copied them for himself at a later time?
He was probably intrigued by certain things that a particular student may have asked to learn from him, so he would make up a sheet and delve into it deeper from there.


*P.S.

For some reason Firefox wouldn't allow me to post, any others having this problem? Do you have to switch to Internet Explorer too?

__________________
EXPERIMENT. Patience and determination are key.
DanSawyer

Registered:
Posts: 289
Reply with quote  #3 
Very good question. It brings up Ted's time management. He was one of those people who felt there were never enough hours in the day. Ted would often only sleep 3 or 4 hours at night, so he could accomplish more. The sheets you are seeing are only a fraction of what he wrote out. Ted had boxes and boxes of this stuff.

TG was also an inveterate reader and writer. You'll notice in photos, he usually had a pencil and pen in his pocket. He came out to hear me play one time and brought a book to read as well as paper to jot down his thoughts. I was not insulted. This is who Ted was.



(no problem posting in Firefox)

__________________
Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
barbarafranklin

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 940
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Andy,
A while back I posted in the Remembrance section - "a funny & wonderful memory" check it out - it will give you an idea of his ability to work, no matter what.

Sometimes Ted slept even less than 3 or 4 hours. He'd sleep in small 15 min. to 1 hour increments. On very rare occasion, maybe once every 2 months he's just pass out and sleep 6 hours & be very upset about sleeping so long when he woke. He thought sleeping was a waste of time.
Ted would never concede that his output was immense - he always commented on J.S. Bach's output and would say " now that's phenomenal".

__________________
Barbara Franklin
MarkThornbury

Registered:
Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #5 
Ted was a big believer and practioner of mental practicing whenever he was without a guitar in his hands and awake.  In response to my question of " How do you find the time to learn all this stuff, and remember it so well, without getting lost?", we spent a lesson without touching the guitar at all, and he explained the technique of practicing while away from the guitar.

He suggested that most guitarists don't really know the fingerboard as well as they think they do, for a variety of good reasons. He told me that the evolution of the guitar fingerboard from early times to the electric neck, with its lengthend range, created such a large matrix of geometric proportions which makes learning it and becoming intimate with it much more difficult than with linear instruments like woodwinds, keyboard, etc. where the notes happen in only one place.

He then said that this phenomonon had hardly been addressed in the standard teaching systems that have been in use for many years, and he explained to me, in his characteristic systematic way, how using the very visual aspect of the guitar (with some pretty intense self-discipline) one can shave a lot of time off rote practicing for fingerboard familiarity purposes, making the time spent with the guitar in hand more effective. 

Before I go on, I was wondering if any of you fellow students went through this drill with Ted?  Either way, does anybody have any interest in the subject?

__________________
Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
Greg

Registered:
Posts: 36
Reply with quote  #6 
The subject of both practicing away from the guitar and being able to visualize the guitar are of extreme intrest to me. I think visualization of the guitar is practically the most important thing at least when get to a certain level. I would very much like it if you shared what Ted has to spoken to you about. And if you have written up sheets that would be a bonus.

Thanks
-Greg
skotrock

Registered:
Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #7 
I've done that a lot myself, especially if I can't sleep- I go through tunes like Donna Lee, or do arpeggios in my head. It seems to help with your ear too, by imagining the sounds. I also try to visualize how music I'm listening to would look on the fretboard, even other instruments like piano or horns. Of course, i don't know how close I am, but its better than counting sheep.
YoungBlood

Registered:
Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkThornbury

Before I go on, I was wondering if any of you fellow students went through this drill with Ted?  Either way, does anybody have any interest in the subject?



Absolutely!!!

__________________
EXPERIMENT. Patience and determination are key.
Bob

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 145
Reply with quote  #9 

Well said Mark. Ted was always encouraging visualization of the fretboard away from the guitar. Like an athlete or an actor visualizes there performance.


__________________
Bob Holt
MarkThornbury

Registered:
Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #10 

I remember the visualization lesson well. Ted pointed out that as keyboard players learn their triads, for instance, they tend to learn them by spelling as well as chord name. When a keyboard player learns an Eb major chord, they also learn it as an [Eb G Bb] combination simultaneous with the name Eb. Guitarists generally don’t.  We have a little extra homework to do to get our mind around our instrument:

 

The first goal is to VERY FIRMLY learn the close voice triads, their spelling & position & degree on all 4 string sets. Start with the key of C, and:

 

1. Spell the key, ascending AND DESCENDING repeatedly with just the note names until it is an automatic response. Then do it again, also adding the Roman Numeral (Degree) before naming the note.

2. Now do it again,  adding  the diatonic qualities, e.g., C, Dminor, Eminor, F, etc.

 

3. Starting with the lowest string set, “see” the I chord, and spell it…C E G , again “visualizing” the C on 8th fret/6th string,  E  on 7th fret/5th string, G on 5th fret/4th string, THINKING the names of the notes at the same time and also the fret numbers of each note.  Then visualize it up an octave on the same set of strings, up at the 17 position, (with C at the 20th fret, E at the 19th) Then transfer to the next string set over, both at the open position( 3rd, 2nd, open), and at the 12th position (15th, 14th, 12th).  Then over to the next set at the 8th position (10th, 9th , 8th).  And then the last set on the top 3 strings, at the 3rd position  & again up an 8va at the 15th .

 

4. Then do the same with the ii chord, likewise the iii, and follow the rest of the scale.

5. Now do this again, only descending order this time.

6. Now do this in F, and proceed through the cycle of 4ths. After you have done the key of Gb, then do F#…the sounds of the notes will of course be the same, but it is critically important that you become equally familiar with the THINKING of the two differently named keys.

 

7. Do likewise with the first inversion, and then the 2nd inversion. Then the open voice triads, in their various forms, and then on to the Systematic Inversions, starting with the small density, then medium, and large. This would today be named V2, etc.

 

I should mention here that step 6 is actually a compromise Ted made, as I balked about learning the key of Cb, and for that matter, C# too(C# minor makes perfect sense, but C# major?). Ted understood, and admitted that for a long time he himself refused to try to think in Cb, but that through time he came around, and hoped that I eventually would too.  

 

While discussing the phenomenon of key signatures, Ted asked me a trivia question, which I shall put out here, just for fun:

 

How many names are there for the all the notes, and why? (I didn’t have the correct answer, but the answer is a bit of a kick !)


__________________
Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
Jordan

Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #11 
in response to the riddle: i'd say infinite. I've never heard of a triple or quatruple sharp or flat, but i don't see why they can't exist. By the way, the step by step method for visualizing is awesome, thanks for sharing.


__________________
Jordan
Buddy_Love

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #12 
Mark,

Thanks for sharing the visualization exercises.  It is just what I've been needing.

Due to some medical problems, the only exercise I can do is walking.  When I first started I was passing the time by being aware of my breathing, meditative breathing, doing a mantra, listening to birds, etc.

Then I decided to visualize the fretboard beginning initially with notes on a single string, up and down the fretboard and then across the frets.  Then I started open chords and was looking at scales, too.  That's a great idea about doing it in degrees and by string sets.

Since I started visualizing the fretboard while walking the hour or so goes by in minutes.  You can get really zoned out.  My wife told me to not forget about the cars. 

Thanks,

Dan


MarkThornbury

Registered:
Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkThornbury

While discussing the phenomenon of key signatures, Ted asked me a trivia question, which I shall put out here, just for fun:

 

How many names are there for the all the notes, and why? (I didn’t have the correct answer, but the answer is a bit of a kick !)

 

Actually, the answer is: 35:  7 natural tones, 7 flatted, 7 sharped (all the key signatures) plus 7 double flatted, & 7 double sharped. Ted pointed out that the double flats & double sharps were for temporary modulations to keep the spelling of the harmony correct...an example of this sort of thing is all over Bach's works. Starting out in C#Major, temporarily modulating to the key of V would put one in the key of G# major, meaning six sharps and an F double-sharp.  Ouch. My brain hurts now...


__________________
Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE