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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hey guys,
We have a bit of a situation this month, and because of it our November Newsletter is up early.  So you don't have to wait until after Halloween to get your new lesson pages.  Come on down right now......
http://www.tedgreene.com/news/default.asp

Lots of good stuff this month, and be sure to check out the Tim Lerch videos.  
BTW, did any of you learn the Munster's Theme for Halloween?  
Enjoy, and keep on pickin'....

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--Paul
James

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Posts: 310
Reply with quote  #2 
For anyone working on Session With The Stars progression #8, which is posted in this month's From The Students, you might be interested in how Ted played a few chords differently in the video than he notated them in his handout.  I described those differences here: 
http://forums.tedgreene.com/post/session-with-the-stars-1258153?&trail=30

lordamercy

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Reply with quote  #3 
James I actually incorporated a couple of your changes into my page!! In fact, it was reading your comment ages ago that made me want to learn Prog.8 - and you were so right, it's incredibly worthwhile learning the whole thing, really helped my playing in a dramatic way..
I wanted my page to be accurate to what Ted actually played on the video as opposed to what's on the handout, so I checked and re-checked everything, analysed it with Melodyne etc - worked out the harmonics at the end and corrected a couple of other chords, so hopefully it's all pretty much spot-on now. Anyway, big thanks to you for originally pointing out the progression, and providing the impetus for me to learn it! 

I uploaded just the progression 8 part of "session with the stars" to youtube at 



should make it easier for anyone else learning it [smile]

Paul, this months stuff is fantastic as always - thanks so much for all the hard work you do, it's truly amazing!! Every month I check out the new stuff that's appeared, and in the process I always notice 4 or 5 other amazing Ted sheets that had totally passed me by - There really is enough on the site already for a whole lifetime's study... I love it!! 
Thanks once again Paul and everyone else involved - I'm so pleased to be able to contribute, it's an honour to work on presenting Ted's amazing material. 
TLerch

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Posts: 251
Reply with quote  #4 
Does anyone else hear this progression (progression#8) as being Born to Loose? He certainly hints at the melody in the second chorus.
Here's a link to Brother Rays version, what do you think? I know Ted was a huge fan of Ray.



All the best
Tim
herb

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Reply with quote  #5 
absolutely !

good call, would have loved to hear ted and ray together 

James

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Reply with quote  #6 
I am very glad we are helping each other here on this site.
TedGreeneFan

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you!
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Bob
goldglob

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm hearing progression #8 as Gershwin's "But not for me".

Bear in mind that people often play the first two bars like that ( E C#m7/ F#m7 B7) rather than the also often F#m9/ B11 B7. Also note that even though the F#7 (bar 13) doesn't exactly fit the melody, that's the way most people play that bar; certainly for the blowing.
Also, (in Ted's chords), look at bar 9, the A dim and bass C to C# hint at 'But not for me', as do the C7/6 and bass A# to B in bar 11.
TLerch

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Goldglob, I'll give a listen with that in mind.
Tim.
PaulV

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Posts: 1,711
Reply with quote  #10 
Hey guys, 
Don't know how many of you all are following the Harp-Harmonics series we've been posting, but this month the page was a real doozy!
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/other/HarpHarmonics_AscendingHarmonicChordsDerivedFromScales_TG_1978.pdf
It ended up being 7 pages of new notation...which was bigger than expected.  That was 119 scales & grids.
The interesting thing that I discovered while working on it was that Ted approached the scale notes similar to how he discovered the 43 4-note chord qualities, as explained by James in the V-System section:
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/v_system/14_The_43_Four-Note_Qualities.pdf
Did anyone catch this?  James?

Working on the pages I was more focused in creating the notation and drawing the grids correctly, and not really analyzing the process that Ted used to come up with all the different note combinations.  But I believe he used similar math or systematic methods as he used to discover the V-System's "Big 43."  
In looking over some of Ted's other work sheets in his Personal Music Studies files, one can see his very thorough systematic or scientific approach to find every possibility in whatever study he was working on.  It's pretty amazing how much thought he put into his approach to music....yet, when he played the feeling and emotional aspect dominates.

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James

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Reply with quote  #11 
I haven't worked through much of Ted's harp harmonic material.  My left thumb can tire quickly holding the six-note chord shapes often involved.  No doubt it's great stuff and perhaps I'll get to it more at some point. Thank you, Paul, for making it much more readable on the page for us.

Yes, it is astounding how Ted used thorough, mathematical thinking to explore every possibility and at the same time his own taste and artistry showed through.  It really demonstrates how influential J.S. Bach was on him.  Bach wrote systematically in every key and wrote fugues in one voice, two, three, etc. and wrote in every form of music that was known in his time, except opera.  And his Passions are essentially religious operas so he kinda wrote that, too.  At the same time, Bach's musicality, inventiveness, and expressiveness always prevailed over his systemization.  His balance of unity and variety is organic, like a tree or a living thing is organic.

I remember saying to Ted in a lesson, "You have accomplished so much.  What do you have left to do?"  And he answered, "There's always Bach."  That was his ideal, his yardstick for his life's attainments, one of his big inspirations.
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