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Wckoek

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Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #1 
Could anyone explain to me what these terms meaned?

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Koek Wei Chew
omobob

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Posts: 111
Reply with quote  #2 
Here's what Wikipedia says http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_sixth 
You might also check the Harvard Dictionary of Music or other reference works for discussion of these terms.
klasaine

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Posts: 151
Reply with quote  #3 
Here's a really good example of a neopolitan vi chord from the moonlight sonata ...
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id122_en.html

http://www.musictheory.net
Look under anaysis - neopolitan 6th chords (possibly augmented 6ths)
They're basically bII chords resolving to I (or i) - that's a  "very" simplified quick explanation.


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ken lasaine
erikgran

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #4 
The German and Italian 6th chords are explained here:

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Erik
bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #5 
The Neapolitan sixth and the augmented sixth sonorities are each a chromatic approach to the dominant. The Wikipedia article is a pretty good introduction to them. Note that the SOUND of the augmented sixth chord is identical to that of a dominant seventh chord (incomplete, in the case of the It+6, complete, in the case of the Ger+6, and with a flat 5, in the case of the Fr+6). They are just spelled differently, function differently, and resolve differently, than the dominant seventh chord. The origin of the jazz substitute dominant resolving to the tonic can be traced to them.
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David Bishop
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