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JeffStocksMusic

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Reply with quote  #1 

Request for a little insight...In several of Mark's lesson tapes, Ted and Mark talk about a page or series of pages called 'minor astronomy'.  Best I can tell it is a breakdown of minor sounds by category(?), perhaps density(?). Anyone care to shed some light into what these pages were? Anyone have copies of them?  Ted put great emphasis on them to Mark so they sounded like they would be of significant value.  Thanks, jeff

barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Jeff!

This is the only page I have with that title. Actually it is just another of Ted's many ways to break down minor chords to show the relationships.
Quite charming. (at least I think so)
Barbara

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SteveBrodie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Minor astronomy??  Thought I'd need to pull out my scope to check those out...Ted mentions in a few of his pages "Japanese" chords.  Anyone know the makeup??  Built on 4th intervals?? Can someone spell one for me?

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Wckoek

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Reply with quote  #4 
Probably off topic, but I saw a book yesterday which discusses different note and its relation to different astrological planet, horoscope sign and its affect on human senses.
Its was entitled "Harmony from heaven and earth" or something like that. It also drew up different combination of notes as a mode.

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JeffStocksMusic

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Reply with quote  #5 

Barbara, Thank you for digging this one out.  From what I can tell in listening to the lesson tapes, I bet this is the correct sheet.  Very interesting, but powerful way of teaching this information.

rafikenn

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Reply with quote  #6 
  Ted ends "it ain't' necessarily so" with a min6/9/#11,nice ending chord.
on the blues in G,you can see how a min7 b9 is used in context.

Deparko

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Reply with quote  #7 
There are so many great minor sounds..I wish I had the time to totally explore them...I find that this is typically a very neglected area. The emotional range of minor sounds is so deep and wide

btw..Barbara pulled the same sheet that Ted and I were discussing on the tape.

Cheers,
Mark
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hey Wckoek,
This also is a bit off the subject, but related to your comment.  This is an excerpt from Paramahansa Yogananda's "Autobiography of a Yogi" (which Ted had read and greatly admired Yogananda):

--sorry for the long post :-)
--Paul


"The foundation stones of Hindu music are ragas or fixed melodic scales. The six basic ragas branch out into 126 derivative raginis (wives) and putras (sons). Each raga has a minimum of five notes: a leading note (vadi or king), a secondary note (samavadi or prime minister), helping notes (anuvadi, attendants), and a dissonant note (vivadi, the enemy).

 

Each of the six basic ragas has a natural correspondence with a certain hour of the day, season of the year, and a presiding deity who bestows a particular potency. Thus, (1) the Hindole Raga is heard only at dawn in the spring, to evoke the mood of universal love; (2) Deepaka Raga is played during the evening in summer, to arouse compassion; (3) Megha Raga is a melody for midday in the rainy season, to summon courage; (4) Bhairava Raga is played in the mornings of August, September, October, to achieve tranquility; (5) Sri Raga is reserved for autumn twilights, to attain pure love; (6) Malkounsa Raga is heard at midnights in winter, for valor.

 

The ancient rishis discovered these laws of sound alliance between nature and man. Because nature is an objectification of Aum, the Primal Sound or Vibratory Word, man can obtain control over all natural manifestations though the use of certain mantras or chants.* Historical documents tell of the remarkable powers possessed by Miyan Tan Sen, sixteenth century court musician for Akbar the Great. Commanded by the Emporer to sing a night raga while the sun was overhead, Tan Sen intoned a mantra that instantly caused the whole palace precincts to become enveloped in darkness.

 

Indian music divides the octave into twenty‑two srutis or demi‑semitones. These microtonal intervals permit fine shades of musical expression unattainable by the Western chromatic scale of twelve semitones. Each of the seven basic notes of the octave is associated in Hindu mythology with a color, and the natural cry of a bird or beast ‑‑ Do with green, and the peacock; Re with red, and the skylark; Mi with gold, and the goat; Fa with yellowish white, and the heron; Sol with black, and the nightingale; La with yellow, and the horse; Si with a combination of all colors, and the elephant.

 

Indian music outlines seventy‑two thatas or scales. A musician has creative scope for endless improvisation around the fixed traditional melody or raga; he concentrates on the sentiment or definitive mood of the structural theme and embroiders it to the limits of his own originality. The Hindu musician does not read set notes; at each playing he clothes anew the bare skeleton of the raga, often confining himself to a single melodic sequence, stressing by repetition all its subtle microtonal and rhythmic variations.

 

Bach, among Western composers, understood the charm and power of repetitious sound slightly differentiated in a hundred complex ways.

 

Sanskrit literature describes 120 talas or time measures. The traditional founder of Hindu music, Bharata, is said to have isolated thirty‑two kinds of tala in the song of a lark. The origin of tala or rhythm is rooted in human movements ‑‑ the double time of walking, and the triple time of respiration in sleep, when inhalation is twice the length of exhalation.

 

India has long recognized the human voice as the most perfect instrument of sound. Hindu music therefore largely confines itself to the voice range of three octaves. For the same reason, melody (relation of successive notes) is stressed, rather than harmony (relation of simultaneous notes).

 

  Hindu music is a subjective, spiritual, and individualistic art, aiming not at symphonic brilliance but at personal harmony with the Over‑Soul. All the celebrated songs of India have been composed by devotees of the Divine. The Sanskrit word for "musician" is bhagavathar, "he who sings the praises of God." The sankirtans or musical gatherings are an effective form of yoga or spiritual discipline, necessitating intense concentration, absorption in the seed thought and sound. Because man himself is an expression of the Creative Word, sound exercises on him a potent and immediate effect. Great religious music of East and West bestows joy on man because it causes a temporary vibratory awakening of one of his occult spinal centers. In those blissful moments a dim memory comes to him of his divine origin."



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Wckoek

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Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #9 
Thank you for the information, Paul.

I recall that book I browse was more directed to western european and greek astrological tradition. I might buy the book when I pass the shop next time and write more about it.

It explains about modes, dorian, phyrigian etc from the tradition, mythology and astrological perspective.

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Koek Wei Chew
DanSawyer

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deparko
There are so many great minor sounds..I wish I had the time to totally explore them… I find that this is typically a very neglected area.
Spud used to say there are more types of minor scales than major. So it makes sense that they would be a bit neglected.

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