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erikgran

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #1 
Read in a thread about swing chords in the AG forum that Mickey Bakers Jazz course was sort of state of the art when Ted's books came. I got curious and got a copy, and to me it seems to be sort of "the missing link" between basic folk/blues chords and "Chord Chemistry". No theory, but seems to be an ok way to learn how to substitute for standard basic chords, I believe it'll be easier to approach CC after working a bit on Baker, at least for me!

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Erik
Wckoek

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Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #2 
Mickey Baker's book, are geared towards RnB music of that era, even if I had the revised edition. Its the book that get you comp and play.
Personally I find some errors on some of the terminology and I do not agree of his teaching on relating runs on soloing.
The book is top on its day because there aren't better guitar books out there those days.

For learning chords, you can try on Jack Peterson's Chords Galore which is easier to relate and learn.

Regards

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Koek Wei Chew
jerome

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Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #3 
For a generation of baby boomers like me, the Mickey Baker Jazz 1 was the "go to" book to learn beginning jazz craft. The book does have some typos in the section on runs and suffers, in a small way, from a lack of explanations at times. However, it was and is a good book. The chord enrichments and substitutions are very usable and the chordal exercises are generally based on the structures of songs such as Honeysuckle Rose, Out Of Nowhere, etc.

On page 2, Baker shows an Ab7#9 but calls it D13b5b9 without explaining what a flat 5 substitution is. Later on he gives a I vi ii V in Bb calling it Rhythm Changes without explaining that Rhythm Changes was jazz slang for the chord progression to I Got Rhythm.

While it's possible to use this book as a self tutor, I would suggest that you consult a teacher to save time and avoid confusion. If that isn't possible, ask questions here. There are all lot of folks here who can answer questions.

Most importantly, apply the information in the book to songs like Autumn Leaves, All Of Me, Indiana, Just Friends etc. as soon as possible.

Regards,
jerome
erikgran

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerome
On page 2, Baker shows an Ab7#9 but calls it D13b5b9 without explaining what a flat 5 substitution is. Later on he gives a I vi ii V in Bb calling it Rhythm Changes without explaining that Rhythm Changes was jazz slang for the chord progression to I Got Rhythm.

Thanks, I noticed those two flaws at first glance through the book, the first by checking his basic 26 chords against Chord Chemistry, and the second I was already aware of.  I've got Conrad Corks "Harmony with Lego Bricks", which seems to be a great approach to learn jazz progressions.

To me the Mickey Baker book is kind of a benchmark to test and fill in my knowledge of chords and jazz guitar technique, which for the moment is a bit here and there, deep at some small fields, and zero at others.

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Erik
James

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Posts: 337
Reply with quote  #5 
Sorry to see an obituary today for Mickey Baker.  Many people got started in jazz with his books.

"First we shall work with chords.  Chords are very important to a jazz musician."

Indeed so.
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