PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

VISIT OUR NEW SUPPORT PORTAL
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Wckoek

Registered:
Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #1 
By working on some of Ted's sheets, I get to understand some of its concepts and various chord forms, but I easily forgets it after I learn.
And I also find it hard to apply or recall what I learned when situation call for me to use it, such as chord melody arrangements and composing etc.
I wondered if anyone here had similar experience and any tips on retaining what you learn before?

__________________
Yours Sincerely.

Koek Wei Chew
Wckoek

Registered:
Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #2 
Yeah, but the volume of what we need to learn to work on a song, as well as the risk of mistakes and difficulties in performance is overwhelming.
Jazz Guitar is hard.
I can see why Ted rarely performs and when he did so, would spend many hours of practice.
But on performance, like when you are required to call a tune, and in a different key, things can be complicated.

__________________
Yours Sincerely.

Koek Wei Chew
Wckoek

Registered:
Posts: 68
Reply with quote  #3 
I understand the number system, I use it for key center analysis, but still reply on positions when it comes to chord playing, because the root is everywhere on the guitar and I find it hard to adapt to certain situation for this numbering thing, especially songs with a lot of modulations.
I just have more problems with chord melody on different keys.

I don't have much problem in improvising over changes, just I couldn't really put licks I learn into work, but lines and ideas. I think this is a good or bad thing, that I am really improvising like Miles Davis does on the spot rather than stock lines and things I practice before.
You are a lawyer right? I am a law student myself.
It was like I couldn't recall statutes and precedents verbatim in exams, but I could get around with it with some ideas, just I couldn't get high marks.

I understand the altered dominants and numbering system, it was just that I don't have good memory, I guess.

__________________
Yours Sincerely.

Koek Wei Chew
DanSawyer

Registered:
Posts: 289
Reply with quote  #4 
A lot of good ideas here so I'll just mention one more; metronome. Practicing with a metronome is a huge help, not just for improving rhythmic accuracy but also for memory. There are many articles about how to practice with a metronome, but basically you start at a slow tempo where you can play every note perfectly. Then every day, push it a bit faster, still trying for perfection. (Drum machines work just as well and may be more fun.)

__________________
Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
WilliamPerry

Registered:
Posts: 63
Reply with quote  #5 

Dan: I didn't have time to read all of the above knowing full well that in my case I wouldn't play any better anyway.  But, I did like your advice about using a metronome.  I purchased mine in 1959; it so beautiful, but when I turned it on it fell apart.  Do you have any advice, I hate to bother Leon with all this stuff.

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE