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sonnyintervals

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #46 
Hi Paul, Yes, I think you're right, add9 makes more sense.
I must admit I never thought of  Cm9, but now you mention it this makes more sense than Ebmaj7, as from what I've noticed of Ted's use of  bVII chord, it is usually a Dominant type. What does anyone else think?

For ex #5, I assume:
Fmaj7 -- Amin7 -- D7 --  G7#5 / C7#9
 I  --  iii  --  VI  --  II7alt / V

Ex#6
Fmaj7  --  Dmin7  --  C9  --  Bbmin11
 I   --  vi  --   V  --  iv 

Steve.

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #47 
Here's #7 & 8:

Attached Images
jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_7-8.jpg (218.18 KB, 40 views)


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Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #48 
Hi Paul and everyone,
I feel bad because I dropped out of the discussion for a bit. I just started a new job and will be living here on site till October. It's not ESP easy to compose my thoughts on my phone, so I'll be posting less for a while, (sigh of relief from forum members).
My best to you all.
Keith
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #49 
Hey Keith, congrats on the new job!
These discussions will continue, so jump in whenever you get a chance.

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spideyguy

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Posts: 35
Reply with quote  #50 
Been awhile since Ive been around (just had a baby so things are crazy right now)

So for 7 I get:

Imaj7 iii V7 AugIV9 (passing) Nat IV9

For 8 i got
I iii IV II/5 course if this is in Bb it could read V vii I IV/5

Dont know if I wrote this out totally right but regardless I am loving these sounds!
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #51 
Hi Chris,
I got something different from you for #7 and 8.  Here's how I see it:

Example #7
Fmaj7----F/A----C9 (no 3rd)----B9---Bb11 (to Bb9)
I----I/3----V7----bV7----IV7

Example #8
F----F/A----Bb----Eb
I----I/3----IV----bVII

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spideyguy

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Posts: 35
Reply with quote  #52 

Ha that's funny, I see where I went wrong there. I was confusing frets and man was I off on the bVII for #8. That's what sleep deprevation does to you

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #53 
Here's examples #9 and 10 - still in the key of F.

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_9-10.jpg (211.14 KB, 15 views)


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sonnyintervals

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #54 
 Hi Paul,

Ex# 9 
F -- F/A -- C9 -- Db9
  I  --  I  --  V --  bVI

Ex#10
F -- Bb9 --  Amin11  -- Abmin7 
  I  --  IV  --  iii  --  biii

Steve.


PaulV

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Reply with quote  #55 
Hi Steve,
I agree with your take on #10.
For #9 I would call the third and fourth chords differently.

F---F/A---F6---Gb6 (or F#6)
I----I----I----bII

Unless you were thinking C13sus and Db13sus.
--Paul


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sonnyintervals

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #56 
Hi Paul, Yes, you're right I misread the last two in ex#9.
 I would never have imagined C13sus, but I can see it as having, from the bass up : R, 4(11), 6(13), and 9, which is interesting.
But yes you're correct that  F6 is the more logical way to see it.
Great stuff, Paul thanks again for posting these and raising my awareness of harmony.

Cheers, Steve. 
LindseyBlair

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #57 
I see a lot of discussion about the function of the flat 7 chord in diatonic harmony in this thread. Here is how I see it, the flat 7 chord in a major key tonality is borrowed from the parallel minor key. for example in the key of C the flat 7 chord would be B flat. B flat is the 7 chord in the key of C minor (the parallel minor key of C major). C minor is the relative minor of the key of E flat major, so the chords in the key of E flat major would be the same as the chords in C minor. (B flat would be the V chord in E flat, or the flat 7 chord in c minor) . In most cases you can substitute  other chords from the keys of E flat major or C minor that function similarly  when a flat 7 chord occurs in a tune that is in a major key. In the key of C try substituting D min 7 flat 5, F min6, A flat Major 7 Flat 5 for the B flat chord in the key of C, they usually work just as well. 
So the other key Ted was probably talking about when he said the flat 7 chord has its own key is the parallel minor key. Makes sense to me, how bout you?
sonnyintervals

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Posts: 40
Reply with quote  #58 
Cool, Lindsey, that makes sense, and helps to explain bVII being a dominant type, because it comes from the parallel minor's, relative major ie in Cmaj the bVII(Bb) would be the V chord of Eb (the relative major of Cmin) 

Cheers, Steve.
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #59 
Moving on to examples #11 and 12:

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_11-12.jpg (224.93 KB, 17 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #60 
Anyone care to comment on #11 and 12?
--Paul

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