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bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #16 
Keith:

You lost me on the tritone thing.  I'm not seeing it.

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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #17 
Functional Re-Harmonization for the Jazz Musician.

Systematic Harmonic Substitution.

Both books by Mike Longo.

He has another book called "Voicing and Voice Leading for the Contemporary Jazz Pianist"

 I'm going to order it soon.

Mr. Longo also put out a DVD tittled "The Rythmic Nature of Jazz.
It's great stuff!

Check out his website.
http://www.jazzbeat.com

K




Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #18 
Hi David,
On the 1st chord ( Bsus2sus4)? notice the perfect 5th created by the F# and the C# on the 4th and 3rd strings respectively. In the next chord ( Am7/6), the interval on the 4th and 3rd strings switches to a 4th. The root note of the 5th interval is F#, the root note of the 4th interval is C. F#5 to C5 is a tritone. I really love that sound, how the 5th interval straddles the 4th interval on either side resolving in contrary motion. It's monster music. Mysterious Island film score sounds. I'm just sayin.

K
Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #19 

Oops, my mistake.
                                           (5th)     (4th)
The inner voices are in fact (F#-C#), (G-C).
F#5 and C5 are a tritone apart.

It's a compelling sound.

Keith

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #20 
So the chord names for examples #5 and #6:

Example #5
Bsus(add9)----Am7/6 [or Am13]----Abm7(b5)----Gm9
Since we're still in the key of D then perhaps:
vi----v7----#ivm7(b5)----iv7
Ted's notes:
"Softer chromaticism with warm #iv[half-dim]7, iv7."
[Maybe the third chord in the series should be named G#m7(b5) rather than Ab...because Ted called it a #iv, and not a flat-v.]

No one has commented on Example #6
A9(no 3rd)----Abm7----Gm7----F#m7
V7----#iv7 [or bv7]----iv7----iii7
Ted's notes:
"Again, towards the very soft iii7"

Beautiful stuff.

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--Paul
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #21 
Examples #7 and #8.
This time Ted has moved to the key of Eb, and we're up above the 12th fret for these babies. Same melodic shape. 
Also try moving it all down 1/2 step (to key of D) and play along with the previous 6 examples.

Attached Images
jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Diatonic_Major_Scale_Melodies,_EX_7-8.jpg (163.64 KB, 39 views)


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Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #22 
 I like how the 1st one ends on the 5 (Bb7/6). It ends unresolved and begs the question, which is answered in the next example.

 Also the 2nd example starts on the 2nd chord of the first example setting up a sequencing effect  like  what Ted described in SNS Volume 1 chapter 6 'Melodic Patterns'. 1765  7654 etc

I've always marveled at how Ted could state and restate a melody with different harmony several times in a row. How it would speak and sound so right and hit all these different emotional points. Brilliant!

Great stuff.

Keith
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #23 
Anyone bold enough to name these 4th chords or try to analyze the progression for examples #7 and 8?

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kontiki

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Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #24 
Example 7 is a slightly disguised  I  vi  ii  V  progression

I  is an Ebmaj13  in V.2 (3rd inversion Maj7 , root up to the 9th, 5th up to the 6th(or13th)

vi  is a C7sus  in V.3  (root position, 3rd up to the 4th)

ii  is an  F7sus  (a second inversion m7 halfway between a V.2 and  a V.3 ) the b7 of the chord is doubled to keep the 4th interval.

V is  Bb7/6  in 3rd inversion of a dominant 7th chord  in V.9  (5th up to the 6th (13th) a Lenny Breau type voicing.

of course the ii could also be considered a V7sus (no 5th)

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #25 
The cool thing about these two examples is the stack of 4ths on the bottom three notes.  They're diatonic and descend in scale-wise steps, the V chord containing a  tri-tone, a result of the diatonic notes.

Ted's note on example #7:
"Airy, non-angular (due to diatonic notes) 4th chords."

Example #8 seems to be the same idea of descending diatonic 4ths, but instead of starting on the I chord as in example #7, it starts on the vi:
Cm11----Fm9/11----Bb11/13----Eb6/9 [or could be thought of as Gm11]
vi----ii----V7sus----I  [or iii]
Ted's notes:
"Same, but more restful ending due to tonic feel."

As Mike mentioned, these are great for getting those Lenny Breau voicings, especially useful for playing above the 12th fret.

Try playing these two examples in sequence, and then maybe continue with the next sequence: 
ii----V----I----IV
Fm11---Bb13----Eb6/9----Ab6/9
( I think that's right....)
--Paul



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spideyguy

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Posts: 35
Reply with quote  #26 

Yeah I have to say I really enjoy higher on the fret board than in the lower octave. For some reason the lower ocative just doesnt "gel" the same as the higher. I assume its because of the arrangement of the voicings and that it just gets muddier on the lower end. I really am loving these exercises/discussion! Keep em comin please!

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #27 
Continuing with examples #9 and #10, now in the key of F, back to the lower portion of the guitar neck. 
Give us the chord names and analysis.

Attached Images
jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Diatonic_Major_Scale_Melodies,_EX_9-10.jpg (154.51 KB, 29 views)


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Keith

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Reply with quote  #28 
1. F/9, Bb Maj9/D, Eb/9, F/9
1. 4. b7. 1

2. F/9, Eb add9#11
Keith

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Posts: 105
Reply with quote  #29 
Sorry about the incomplete post, I'm trying to do this on my phone.
Ex 2
F/9 Eb/9#11 Bb/9/D Fadd9/C
1. b7. 4. 1

The b7 is a common sound in American music. It comes from F mixolydian which is only 1flat (Eb) away from the key of F Ionian.
Think F, Eb, Bb, F.
Keith
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #30 
Great Keith.
I'm going to duplicate your comments here (you'll see why later)

Example #9
F/9----Bbmaj9/D----Eb/9----F/9
I----IV----bVII----I
Ted's note:
"Exp. Diat. [expanded diationicism, or expanded diatonic key] again for the next 4 examples."
Ted also offers to play Bb(add9)/F or Bbmaj9/F for the final chord instead of the I.

Example #10
F/9----Eb(add9,add11)----Bb/9----F/9
I----bVII----IV----I

It appears that using a major chord built on the flatted-seventh degree is what Ted is referring to as "expanded diatonicism" here and in examples #2.
I love this stuff.
--Paul


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