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James

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Posts: 309
Reply with quote  #1 
I'd like to share some fingerings for a few of the V-6 chords.

The one for the Bmaj7 with the root in the soprano wasn't at all obvious to me.  At first I tried double stopping with the pinky.  That's really hard and didn't work for me.  But a pinky barre that covers the unused 4th string and tilts up to miss the first string did the trick.

The B7 with the fifth in the soprano can be double stopped or second finger barred.  I can't decide which is easier.

The cross fingered B7 with the b7 on top might be useful in certain situations.  Like on the first line of Ted's sheet Learning V-6 colors.  The fifth and sixth chords are A7 going to Dmaj7 with a tie.  I'd use the cross fingering in that situation.

The Bm7 seems easier with the fifth finger technique (diagonal first finger barre) than with separate fingers.

Let me know if any of these suggestions are helpful.  Maybe you have some other good fingerings.  Sometimes, in lessons, I asked Ted how to finger certain chords in his arrangements.  He would often have two or three good fingerings.  He also would finger things in ways that weren't always immediately obvious to me.  And sometimes fingering can make all the difference.

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kontiki

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Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
The one for the Bmaj7 with the root in the soprano wasn't at all obvious to me.  At first I tried double stopping with the pinky.  That's really hard and didn't work for me.  But a pinky barre that covers the unused 4th string and tilts up to miss the first string did the trick.

I've always practiced that one using my thumb to play the high-e string (similar to the cello technique) but it's true that the way you describe works for me as well. I'm still faster with the thumb, but this provides a good example to work on pinky bars (i'm always looking for practice material for the pinky bar, especially lifting it up while retaining some of the notes in the bar).

Quote:
The B7 with the fifth in the soprano can be double stopped or second finger barred.  I can't decide which is easier.
again, I agree but i usually will go with a fingering that will leave one of my fingers free for melody or embellishment, so I'll go for the double stop 9 times out of 10.

Quote:
The Bm7 seems easier with the fifth finger technique (diagonal first finger barre) than with separate fingers.
when I saw the fingering Ted suggested for this on the sheet (
the fifth finger technique) it was a revelation for me. And yet it seems so obvious. I have been re-converting alot of my fingerings to the fifth finger technique, but somehow i missed this one. Now it'll never be the same . By the way, every time I play this voicing out of context, i automatically hear the intro to the Queen tune "You're my best friend" and start playing that tune.

Quote:
The cross fingered B7 with the b7 on top might be useful in certain situations.  Like on the first line of Ted's sheet Learning V-6 colors.  The fifth and sixth chords are A7 going to Dmaj7 with a tie.  I'd use the cross fingering in that situation.
 this is an interesting point. For example the cross fingering (3rd finger in the bass) works well when going to and/or coming from I7 to IV7/5 or 1° or from  V7/5 or V7/b5 to I7 etc.

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James

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Posts: 309
Reply with quote  #3 
For the maj7, I like the thumb on the fingerboard for the soprano, too. I also was doing thumb on the bass note: T341 and that works pretty well, too.  When I saw Ted showing 3441, it seemed too hard until I figured out to use the barre rather than the double stop.  It's a pretty hard chord no matter what, in terms of using it in a progression.  But it's sounds good.

Thanks, for your thoughts on fingerings, kontiki.
kontiki

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Posts: 256
Reply with quote  #4 
There"s also another way of playing the  Bmaj7 that works pretty well for me, but takes getting used to. That's transferring the top 3 notes to the 4th 3rd and 2nd strings and plaing the soprano with a sort of reversed 5th finger technique. by this i mean the first finger will fret the bass an the soprano a fret higher.

plus one could always fret the bass with one's nose

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James

Registered:
Posts: 309
Reply with quote  #5 
I like your top 3 string transferred fingering with the reversed fifth finger.  It also works well with the thumb taking the bass, at least in some areas of the neck.  Cool!
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