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wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #31 
If you mean my baroque example I have an image attached to one post above and mp3 of the example both in this thread. 

PS. I don't get a lot of these forum notification emails although I am subscribed to the thread for some reason...

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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #32 
As I said, I'm more than happy (and perhaps a little excited) to post my thoughts about these pieces, but perhaps it might be more rewarding if you just dive in yourself and see what you come up with on your own.  The one I suggested, Invention no. 6 in E major, is a wonderful piece (a personal favorite), full of cool syncopations, but not too difficult harmonically over all (right...easy for me to say).  If we're going to concentrate on harmonies, as Charles would like, keep in mind that in these inventions (and other similar contrapuntal pieces) harmonies are often hinted at more than stated overtly.  Think simply; don't over analyze, limit yourselves to triads and seventh chords.  You might look at the big picture first (key areas) and then delve into the details.  What do you think?
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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
bishopdm

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Reply with quote  #33 
The Bach Inventions (and many, many other works) are available online for free download at http://imslp.org/wiki/ (everything available is in the public domain).
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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
wkriski

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Reply with quote  #34 
Thanks David. 
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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
Gonzalo

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #35 
Dear Barbara: It would be great if you can post Ted´s comments on your score. I really love watching some of your other scans, in wich Ted analyses the Chorales, or Harmony books. It´s really nice that by now, Ted´s trace is so familiar to me.

Thanks a lot!!!

barbarafranklin

Moderator
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Posts: 940
Reply with quote  #36 
Okay Gonzalo, here it is, hope it is readable.  Notice Bach's clever use of the cycle of fourths!

Charles - this might be just what you were looking for too?

Enjoy!  Barbara

Attached Images
jpeg Bach_Inv._#13_Ami_w:Ted's_notes_pg.1.jpg (901.36 KB, 107 views)
jpeg Bach_inv._#13_w:Ted_pg.2.jpg (956.86 KB, 74 views)
jpeg Bach_inv._#13_w:Ted_pg.3.jpg (920.05 KB, 61 views)


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Barbara Franklin

Gonzalo

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #37 
Barbara: As always, SO nice of you!!!!! I´m starting to work on Ted´s transcription, and this analysis is so useful( and yes, those cycle of 4ths!!)
Again let me thank you. How nice of you to spread all this beauty for us
Gonzalo

bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #38 
I decided to begin with a less chordal invention (i.e., different to the one Barbara posted and the E major that I originally thought to analyze, which both contain primarily arpeggios) to show how harmony can be expressed in a linear fashion.  I haven't finished the entire invention, but this should give you something to consider until I do.  Please feel free to ask questions (or please correct me if I've goofed) about my analytical process.  I've indicated a couple of places where sevenths come into play.  The crossed dotted lines indicate what is termed a "voice exchange," which is a contrapuntal device that serves to prolong a single harmony over time.  Note that the primary harmonies are mostly I, IV, and V, nothing fancy going on.  The harmonies in parentheses are subordinate to these harmonies and are a result of the moving voices within a prolonged harmony.

The overall harmonic movement is from tonic to a cadence in the key of G-major (the key of the dominant).  The curly bracket under the chord grouping right before the cadence indicates that both chords (one six-four/five) should be considered as one harmony:  the dominant of G-major.  This is a very common pattern to mark the location of an important cadence.

Please let me know if this is at all helpful or too much to take in.  Thanks, everyone, for your interest in this.

Attached Images
jpeg Invention1_page1.jpg (489.16 KB, 87 views)


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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ

bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #39 
I forgot to mention that P = passing tone and N = neighbor tone (some of these could be interpreted several ways).
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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #40 
Thanks a lot David, That is exactly what we are looking for. I prefer this to arpeggiated chords as well.

I've been making huge strides after I started to document my findings and realizing that to some extent it's quite straightforward as far as chord changes and modulating. And I'm figuring out a fair amount from Ted's videos. I'm so grateful to Steve for recording these! Using the diatonic cycle of fourths and starting with root and 3rds in half notes, the root/3rd to third/root in quarter notes for more movement, it's incredibly melodic, then connecting this framework with other tones, it's very enjoyable.

Some of the issues for learning this style is that a lot of the pieces are fairly difficult and if you add counterpoint and other exercises it can lead people to give up. So I'm writing out a series of what I hope will be a step by step progressive approach.


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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
Zorshelter

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Posts: 86
Reply with quote  #41 
Lot's of cool stuffs happening here, I oughta come more frequently and above all put my hands to work on this,

@wkriski when you have time please share with us what you found so far, thank you
wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #42 
Check this out from another thread http://forums.tedgreene.com/file?id=253673

A nice way to start using open triads.

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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #43 
Here's a partial transcription of Ted's part 1 baroque improv video I did. More to come. Make notes ring and you might find better fingerings but the notes are there. I tried to watch what Ted was doing but it will take more time to nail everything down.

Attached Images
jpeg tedgreenebaroqueimprovpart1.JPG (95.01 KB, 76 views)


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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com

omobob

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Reply with quote  #44 
Will, this is terrific. Thanks!
Zorshelter

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Reply with quote  #45 
Great Will, thank you for that, hope I'll honour your effort by having a close look at your transcription, keep up the good work
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