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Slidesorcerer

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #1 
I was stoked to find the TedGreene.com site and immediately starting downloading and playing through lessons. One that intrigued me was the "Chord Hearts" lesson. It seems to be some interesting voicings harmonized pentatonicly but I am unsure of Ted's concept since there is no text that clarifies this specifically. Can anyone help me out with the skinny on these 3 pages?
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Slide, Welcome!  In the October 2007 Newsletter (available in the newsletter archives), Ted's student, Bob Holt wrote commentary on Chord Hearts.  Hope this helps. Barbara 
Here it is:


  ....these pages represent pentatonic scales played in three-note stackings that contain notes of a major 6/9 chord (Note: they are not necessarily triads). My recollection is that Ted played these with fingers 1, 2 and 3, leaving the 4th finger open for embellishment. He would play them concerted (i.e., all notes sounded at once) or as arpeggios, playing up and down the stack. Or he would play them with one of his favorite devices – first the inner voice then the outer voices, next chord play the outer voices and then the inner voices, and vice versa. In his later examples he creates little motifs, moving the stacks up the neck, melodically. The thing I remember very vividly was how much this would sound like Eric Johnson’s floating harmonies; since the major 6/9 chord is synonymous with the minor 7/11 chord, the same forms would work in minor. The third page is different from the first two in that he’s added the major 7th, which creates the larger stretches and he’s not moving up the neck symmetrically, but making adjustments based on his ear. -- Bob

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Barbara Franklin
Slidesorcerer

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks so much Barabara! The site is amazing and an incredible resource for players. I am sure Ted would be pleased to be reaching so many students still with his great ideas.
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