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ren

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #1 

Hi.

Well, I was excited to find the Chord Chemistry essential Chord diagrams because I really trust Ted to know the essential one's to use but I cannot understand the names of the chord diagrams.

For example I understand:

A =A Major
Am=A Minor

But what does the "/" "()"mean? For example: What does A6(9) or A/9 or A6/9 or Am7flat5(9)(11)

Help much appreciated. I know basic jazz chords so don't know why I shoud have trouble understanding these.

Thanks!

barbarafranklin

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Posts: 940
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Ren,  I am attaching Ted's Chord Formulas chart (I think it's already in here somewhere)  I hope it helps.  These are all symbols to designate chord extensions, add ons etc.  Ted was trying to "unify" the symbols.
sometimes the () means the note is optional  - also sometimes / indicates which note is in the bass.  I am sorry it is still so confusing.   Barbara  
Here is the chart:



Attached Images
jpeg chord_formulas.jpg (916.22 KB, 222 views)


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Barbara Franklin

ren

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you from the UK Somerset. I will write again when I have had a crack at learning my chosen essential chords vocings. I am just having fun watching Ted's videos on youtube now.

Cheers.
wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #4 
Since chord melody usually involves playing chords with the melody on top I just take basic jazz chords and go through each note of the scale putting that note on top. So you can play every possible note with only a couple easy voicings. Then over time you could substitute different voicings to build up your vocabulary, ones that sound nicer, are more challenging to play, etc from the Chord Chemistry book. 

In other words make sure you can actually play songs from beginning to end at the same time you are learning new chords.

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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
guitslim

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #5 
Very sage advice IMO.   The way you describe is really how all guitar players learned chord melody before the "jazz education" explosion. 
 This has the added benefit of making the player able to perform songs for fun and profit!!  
 Remember, Ted was able to play all those hard fingerings,  in time .
 Meaning without slowing down or speeding up   so it sounded to the listener like it was easy to do.       What is easy and sounds that way is relative to each of us at any time in our development.  
       I've seen "comfort fingerings" on his chord sheets and He mentions playing what you are able to in several of the various recorded lessons or clinics I've heard.      Then, you can keep working on the difficult things and they will slowly work into your playing.
 Over the years I've found this to be true of single line soloing as well.
          
LeonWhite

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Reply with quote  #6 
Good luck. The fingerings are important, but only the notes matter. Its all about the musical sound, the movement through the piece.  Learn tunes as Joe Pass said to many (including me).  How powerful and overlooked that advice is.
I've often found that if you start with a new chord (for me the add 9 or sus families of ambiguous chords), that a song is suggested.  Just moving the fingering around can often perk up a progression too.  In another thread here folks were talking about Ted's favorite composers.  one of the movie composer's 'tricks' was to move major sounding progressions up a minor third interval  (C to Eb for example).  Try that too.

Most importantly, keep asking questions here.  This IS the home of folks who care about all this and are willing to help.

L
ren

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #7 
Ummm... don't understand how any of your answers are relevant apart from Barbaras. Maybe you misunderstood. I don't understand how to read the chord diagrams.

Are there any other Ted Greene resources where I can learn his suggested essential chords. Or any other chord books he would have suggested to learn these...

?
James

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Posts: 337
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Ren,

/9 means add9: the chord tones are 1 3 5 9.
The slash here distinguishes the added 9 chord from the dominant 9, which contains 1 3 5 b7 9 (contains a b7).
6/9 means the chord tones are 1 3 5 6 9.
7/6 means 1 3 5 6 b7 which Ted distinguished from
13 which means 1 3 5 b7 9 13. (13 contains a 9th)

So one kind of use of / is just to separate chord tones named in the symbol.

Sometimes Ted uses / to indicate a bass note:
C/D means a C triad (C E G) with D added in the bass.
He uses notation like this when he talks about "bass-energized" triads or other times when what is in the bass is of great interest. But elsewhere, he doesn't indicate the bass explicitly. He might have a C7 chord with an E in the bass and just call it a C7. So C7 can mean any inversion (any chord tone in the bass), not just root position (root in the bass).

Parentheses indicate chord tones that are implied by the context of the chord (surrounding chords) but that are not present in the chord. C(m)7/11 means that the third of the chord, Eb, is left out of the voicing but that the context implies that had it been included, it would have been Eb and not E.

+ means #5.
o with a slash through it means half-diminished which he sometimes writes. Often, however, he writes m7b5.

\, the forward slash is used to indicate what note is in the soprano. Bb6\6 means that the 6th, or G, is in the soprano. In his later writings, Ted emphasized thinking in terms of the soprano more and more and so this kind of notation is used more.

In general, Ted wrote chord symbols that are slightly more detailed and explicit in describing the chord tone content than some conventional chord symbols are. Conventional symbols can be a little ambiguous.

As for essential chords, 5 Main Areas of The Fingerboard, in the Fundamentals section of the lesson area contains some basic, essential chords.

The two pages in Chord Chemistry called Essential Chords contain a huge number of chords, when you consider that each circle representing an optional note means that one chord grid can describe up to ten or so different chords! Those two pages are a ton of material and easily overwhelming. Ted jokingly referred to his book as "Chord Catastrophe". Later, with many students, he would introduce chords more gradually. So take your time and explore. One player's "essential chord" is another's rarity! Please enjoy discovery of what is essential for you. Your own unique playing voice will gradually unfold.

Hope that helps.
ren

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for those explanations James and great advice!! I think that the essential section in the Chord Chemistry is maybe not what I'm looking for.

Are there any other Jazz chord books you can reccomend which are good and contain "essential" or handy chords. I'm thinking of getting the Mickey Baker series. Did Ted reccomend these books? I head a story that Lenny Breau gave it to someone.

I'm also to buy a book of tabs for nasic harmonized scales...I think I heard Ted reccomending that on the Baquoqe lesson and also Lenny Breau has said that they are worth learning.
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #10 
Hello Ren,  Have you looked in the lessons section under Harmony - there are some pages titled Harmonizing Scale lines - might these be of any help?  Barbara

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Barbara Franklin
James

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Posts: 337
Reply with quote  #11 
Ren,

I'm with Barbara that there are some great resources right here tedgreene.com. You may find things of interest in categories other than Fundamentals. Lots of great stuff here and new stuff arrives regularly.

Ted's two chord books are great. I didn't mean to discourage you from Chord Chemistry. Just to let you know that it can be intense. That just means you take it in bite size pieces. For harmonized scales, there is a great section near the beginning of Ted's Modern Chord Progressions book called Diatonic Chord Scales and String Transference.

Go to Dan Sindel's web site:
http://www.dansindel.us/TedGreene.asp
and scroll down to the bottom of the page. There are three handout sheets from Ted that you can download with basic chords. These are great sheets for fundamental chords.

Mickey Baker's books are okay. His approach, particularly in the first few pages, is to give you a couple of dozen chords and get you really familiar with them, using them up and down the neck in all keys. His colloquial comments are kind of funny. I especially like what he says on the first page because it is almost the antithesis of Ted's approach:

"We have to limit ourselves to the most important chords, because, as you know, there are so many meaningless chords for guitar that this has to be done."

That makes me laugh.

I very much liked Leon White's book Chord Systems 2. Alas, it is now out of print and unavailable. It introduced and gave exercises for using systematic inversions of what Ted calls V-2 and V-4 chords. These are staple jazz chords.

These days there may be some web sites for learning these things, too. I'm sure there are also some other good books that are still in print. Personally, I worked through stacks of books and Ted sheets and still do.

Hope that helps.
ren

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #12 
Thankyou all for the advice. Very good. Prehaps I should introduce myself. My name is Iain Reynolds (nickname Ren) I am 23 and live in Somerset UK. Love Ted Greene's shimmering, symphonic harmony classical/jazz music and am just looking for resources to help become a better player. Am getting a lot from watching Ted's videos.

I like fingerstyle acoustic/jazz/country style mainly and am also interested in chinese/persian/gypsy/indian scales etc Also a big fan of Lenny Breau, Bill Evans and Jo Stafford. I will check out those resources you spoke of.

Currently I am learning modes, basic scales, intervals, arpeggios like the back of my hand and am right now about to begin learning the major scale harmonized in four note chords vertically and horizontlaly on the fretboard.

Thanks.
barbarafranklin

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Posts: 940
Reply with quote  #13 
Well then,  a belated Welcome Ren!  Seems as if you have a lot on your plate to study at present.  As you've probably discovered, there is a wealth of resources available here... and there's even more to come.
Not much pleases me more than when someone loves Ted's style of playing.
  Best to you, Barbara



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Barbara Franklin
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