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ChemicalChords

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Posts: 78
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,
     I was wondering if you know a systematic way of learning the guitar in all its aspects. I read all these wonderful threads about Baroque Harmony or modulations. There all interesting but what are the necessary skills I have to learn inorder to fully understand and apply these techniques. I want to know if someone could outline almost a like family tree of what parts of theory extend into other more advanced things. Then even in technique could anyone recommend books or exercises that would be helpful. I seem to be almost spread out because there are so many things that I want to grasp, understand, and able to play fluidly. I have Teds Chord Chemistry, and single line vol. 1. Im am also studying these berklee books by William Leavitt. I am relatively young, but also relatively old "19 to be exact" and I just want to nail these basics to the bone. Anyway not to be overly dramatic, I would appreciate if anyone had any insight into this subject or maybe, perhaps Ted wrote pages on this subject. Thank so much. Sam

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Sam
MarkThornbury

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Reply with quote  #2 

I would start with the basic three note triads. Just the closed voice (less than an octave span) in the root position, then 1st & second inversions. Ted said that one could not over-estimate the power of these simple creatures, they are naturally present in the overtone system, etc, but more to your point, they serve as a fundamental, systematic approach to music, from which everything else in music is built (at least in the Western Hemisphere).

Start simple, limiting yourself to one key at first, learning HOW TO SPELL each of the 7 chords in that key. The chord name and its spelling should be equal in your mind. It will take some time and work, but I can assure you that it will be time well spent.

Under the topic of "Practice Time" I went through the basic routine Ted gave me for mental practicing the fretboard, but the same idea applies to having the guitar in your hands at first, until you are very familiar with the triads, etc. If you have any questions about spelling the triads, I have a sheet Ted gave me which helps clarify the logic, which I can post if you wish. 


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Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
ChemicalChords

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Reply with quote  #3 

What makes me happy is knowing I am consistently practicing in the most productive way possible. I see learning triads as an exciting starting point, thanks Mark. If you dont mind, do you think that you could post that sheet Ted wrote you to clarify the logic of triads. I know what they are, the 1, 3, and 5 of a key, though seeing it from Teds view my clear up anyone unknowns for me, thanks man.

Leon, that list sounds like a great Idea to start for myself, thank you for that suggestion also. I dont think there is anywhere else on the web where you can get as intimate with people (in terms of music), and study as far-out a stuff, as you can on here on these webpage. Thanks so much. 

Mark when you say Root Position 1st & 2nd inversions do you mean say memorizing root C,E, and G all over the first position the E, G, C then G, E, C in the first position also, and then progress onto 2nd position and so on. What do you mean when you say each of the 7 chords in that key? Isnt there only triad C, E, G for the key of C?

How would you go about writing triads down on a piece of paper?

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Sam
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Sam, Here are a few pages that might help. Also perhaps you would benefit from a Basic Theory Music Book. There are zillions to choose from, look through a few & choose one that is the most comprehensible to YOU. B.

http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/chords/GettingAcquaintedWithTriads.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/fundamentals/TriadSpelling_1975-02-09.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/fundamentals/MusicalPriorities_TedGreene_1976-05-25_WithTypedText.pdf


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Barbara Franklin
MarkThornbury

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Reply with quote  #5 
The last 2 of the three sheets Barb posted is what I was going to post. The first one is one I haven't seen before, and an excellent place to start.

When I speak of the 7 chords, I mean a triad formed for each of the 7 notes in a major scale; the triads are started by harmonizing each note in the scale, using every other scale tone: 

C E G for C major, the I chord
D F A for D minor, the ii chord
E G B for E minor, the iii chord
F A C for F major, the IV chord
G B D for G major, the V chord
A C E for A minor, the vi chord
B D F for B diminished, the vii chord (notice this sounds like a G7 chord)

Learn these thoroughly before attempting the 1st & second inversions. I would suggest finding them on the bottom 3 strings, then the next set of 3, and so on.  The first sheet Barb posted introduces you to  some of the shapes on the 2nd set. Again, a great place to start.

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Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
ChemicalChords

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Reply with quote  #6 
WOW Thanks alot Barbara, your the bomb, and so is Ted for writing that out. How to you resize the PDF file so that when you print it so that you are not printing up a blown up corner of the page? I tried printing one of them and I got the three chords of E, just really big. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you so much for taking the time to post those pages.

Also, thank you Mark for clarifying your instructions on learning Triads and so on. I finally understand why Major chords have a harmonized scale pattern of MmmMMmdM. Thanks man.

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Sam
barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Sam,
I have minimal computer knowledge, so someone else will have to give you instructions in that area. Sorry. Someone please?

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Barbara Franklin
Buddy_Love

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Reply with quote  #8 
Mark, Leon, and Barbara,

Thanks again for the great posts.

Dan
DanSawyer

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Posts: 289
Reply with quote  #9 
Going back to basics; learn every note on every string. This is something i faked for years but regret it. Even before learning the notes, learn the frets. In other words, know where the 3rd, 5th, 10th, etc frets are without any thought. It should be automatic that if someone says, "put your 3rd finger on the 11th fret" you can do it instantly. TG knew the guitar neck better than anyone.

There are some fretboard flash cards that are really good for learning this;

http://www.12tonemusic.com/product_info.php/pName/guitar-fretboard-flashcards/cName/guitar-flashcards

Highly recommended!




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Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
MarkThornbury

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalChords
. How to you resize the PDF file so that when you print it so that you are not printing up a blown up corner of the page?


First left click to enlarge the page, then right click, drop down to"save picture as.." and save it to your desktop or something convenient like that. Then when you open it, it should  print out correctly . We WISH that we could do PDF files!

 And I couldn't agree more with Dan...knowing the frets, and what notes are on each fret (Including their enharmonic equals!) is paramount, yet so difficult for most of us because our ears let us get away with it for far too long. I used to watch in amazement as Ted would grab any chord, and name the notes, from bottom to top(or vice versa) in what seemed like less than a second of time. All this along with his ears!

But please remember, as Ted used to tell us, this is learnable. All it takes is discipline!


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Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)
ChemicalChords

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hey Mark, you know that second page titled Getting Acquainted with Triads, when you are writing in the chords for say the first chord of the 2nd row, would you title it G#/Emaj or would you just write Emaj. Also does Ted just want me to write the chords names and the roman numerals and nothing more? Thanks, Sam.

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Sam
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #12 
Sam,
I think you'd simply write E/G# -- that is, an E major triad in 1st inversion, or 3rd in the bass.  You could also write in the roman numeral, and this would help to see the triad in the context of the other chords.
--Paul

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--Paul
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