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Jordan

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #1 
When listening to Mark Levy's taped lessons with Ted, I heard a discussion about aplications of 6/9 chords, and I was wondering if any of his former students might have any insights into the use of 6/9 chords. I can imagine that because the chord contains all the notes of a major pentatonic scale it could probably yield some cool sounds.

All the best,

Jordan Lebrun

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Jordan
LA91331

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #2 
I like to think of the 6/9(6add9) chord as just a major chord with extensions for coloring. I would use it for a i(first) chord. You could use it as a V chord, but I think the V7 is a lot better. Like a V9, V13, V11 etc.... Of course, this is a matter of taste. Voicings and melody have to be taken into consideration.

Example:

Dmaj9 - D6/9 - Emin7/11 - A7b9#5 - Dmaj6



That's just the way I would use it.  Any suggestions?


Oscar
Bob

Moderator
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Posts: 145
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Jordan,
 Your right on with the 6/9 and pentatonic relationship. Ted had me stack 3 part chords utilizing every other note of the major, minor and dominant pentatonic scales. It did start me thirsting for the McCoy Tyner sounds that occur with stacked fourths. Ted does an example of the stacked fourths comping in one of the "California Vintage Guitar" seminars. It's very instructive. 

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Bob Holt
MarkThornbury

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Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #4 
Here's a sheet I did for Ted...the assignment was to take a G pentatonic scale, and write all the notes of the scale in 3-note & then 4-note stacks. Try them out, they're laid out both horizontally & vertically.

If you like them, I have something similar that Ted had me do for a different pentatonic scale, one for dominant 9th chords...

Attached Images
jpeg 6_9_Pentatonic_Chord_Scale.jpg (559.28 KB, 401 views)


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Esto sicut Theodorus! (Be like Ted)

Jordan

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #5 

Thank you very much Mark, it would be cool to see the other sheets to.

Jordan



 

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Jordan
MarkThornbury

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Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #6 

Here's the rest of the assignment. If you have the ability to "pedal"a G note underneath, from an organ or synth, the sounds will make more sense.

Attached Images
jpeg 9th_Pentatonic_sounds_1.jpg (535.00 KB, 212 views)
jpeg 9th_Pentatonic_sounds_2.jpg (569.42 KB, 163 views)
jpeg Minor_6_9_Pentatonic_sounds.jpg (557.07 KB, 134 views)


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DanSawyer

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Posts: 289
Reply with quote  #7 
6/9 chords are good jazzy substitutions for major type chords. They work especially well if the melody is the 5th. Just be careful if the singer or melody is on the major 7th. For instance in Misty; "Look at Me", on the word Me, it would be better to play a major 7 or major 9 chord.

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Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
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