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barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #16 
Little Ted,
Thank you so much for sharing your story with everyone. How encouraging to hear from someone your age, and how very rare at such a young age to perceive the beauty, poignancy and depth music has to offer. I am especially grateful you found Ted, for it is up to you and your generation to continue putting beauty into the music, therefore inspiring the generations to come. I believe you shall succeed. Barbara

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BrianB

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Reply with quote  #17 
When I first heard Ted, not simply of Ted, I could do nothing but listen. I started to teach guitar lesssons when I was 18, and right before then my teacher showed me his copy of Chord Chemistry. My teacher was a Berklee graduate, but he wasn't very knowledgable when it came to solo guitar, which was always a passion of mine.

I thought I knew several chords, and quite a few inversions, but inside I still felt lost. But I found myself, or rather Ted found me, and through him I began to sit and study music for hours a day, and still do.

But I didn't really know Ted until I was 19, and I stumbled upon a copy of Solo Guitar. That's the moment I felt I knew Ted, not just as a player, but as a person. His lone album changed my perception of the guitar, and what is possible.

Not to sound so similar to little_ted but I can't help it. It's how it all happened. I'm happy to see that people my age, I just turned 20, can appreciate Ted. I hope some day we all can meet, with our tele's and guilds that have all been highly modified, and sit down and talk about Ted. I love this forum, and it's helped me learn more about a man I admire greatly.

DanSawyer

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBrodie
I remember my first lesson with Ted pretty clearly.  Triads(with inversions), systematic inversions…
Steve, the most valuable thing (guitarwise) that i got from TG was probably the systematic inversions of triads that he used to teach. When Adam Tyler was studying with Ted, i asked how he was enjoying the systematic inversions and was surprised to find out he hadn't heard of it. When I asked Ted about this, he said that he stopped teaching that concept years ago because his students were lazy and didn't want to learn it.

Now that i think about it, there was a shift in the way TG taught guitar to his students. In the early days, he had more of a method; a procedure his students were put through (systematic inversions, etc). Later, he changed his teaching and allowed the student to direct it. In other words, he would ask the student "What would you like to learn today?" instead of; "today we will study 7th chords". I don't believe Ted ever put his systematic inversion lessons in a book. It was developed after Chord Chemistry.


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SteveBrodie

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Reply with quote  #19 
Dan

I started lessons with Ted, before the release of his book.  In fact,somtime into the lessons(maybe a few months after I started),  I remember asking him what the stack of material was under his chair.  He told me, he was working on putting together a book.  His book came out a year or two later.  I remember buying it, thumbing through it, and recognizing many of the ideas, from the lessons.  Also, look at page 10 of his book...I described earlier my memory of my 1st lesson.  I am 99.9% certain that we covered systmenatic inversions (using A7 a the reference) on the very 1st meeting.  I also remember the 1st edition of chord chemistry being differenct then the 2nd.  In the 2nd, he added in the section called ":essential chords".  I asked him why he did this and I don't remember what he said. 

I agree with you.  In my opinion, the systematic inversion concept was certainly way up there in importance of all of the things he showed me.  When I heard him play at Spazios, I told him how much I liked his playing, and his humble response was something like, "I'm just running the neck."  Knowing about systematic inversions, I walked away from that short conversation, at least thinking I knew what he meant..In his later years of teaching, was he still using the "backcycling " terminology? 

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earsoup

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Reply with quote  #20 
wow, do you care to elaborate on systematic inversions in the Harmony section ?

thanks
SteveBrodie

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Reply with quote  #21 
I wrote out grids and some explainations somewhere on the site a while ago(maybe a year ago)..  I'll try to locate it here and attach the link.  If I can't find it, I try to find what I wrote out, and repost it. 

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SteveBrodie

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Reply with quote  #22 
Go here

http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/lwhite1000/vpost?id=1438287&highlight=systematic+inversions

Around 1/2 way down you'll find mine.  There are several others on that page too


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DanSawyer

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Reply with quote  #23 
When he showed it to me, it was triads not 7th chords or 6th chords. Just triads; closed voiced first and after you learned all of those, it was open voiced triads. The 7ths and 6th chords are good to learn too, but after you do all the triads. Basically it's playing all 3 inversions of all the major and minor triads on every set of 3 strings. But Ted had a "system" for playing them. I can't remember the system now, but it was a huge help in learning the fingerboard.

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SteveBrodie

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Reply with quote  #24 
You really got me thinking back now.  OK,  I remember him showing me the 12 closed voiced maj triads(notes on adjacent strings).  There where 12 triads within 3 positions.  Then for open triads, he told me to do something like this,,take the middle note of each, and raise or lower it an octave.  Then.. diatonic chord scales on each...somewhere in there...and explaination of crossovers(same chord on diff set of strings),,,then, I-IV-V progressions,,,somewhere in there all the handout sheets of various progressions started.....

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LeonWhite

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Reply with quote  #25 

Though I learned triad and 4 note inversions from another guitarist initially, I too had the three note triads as part of 'the system.'  Ted reminded me that they were at the heart of music like Bach, as well as areas like country.  Dan, you're right about the system - I hadn't thought about it for years but he certainly did have a 'program' of sorts that was moderately uniform.


The impact of learning the triads was the realization that those three little notes could be leveraged into so much music.  That's where it hit me - thanks to Ted.  In fact that open voiced 'exploration' of "the natural" I almost played a while ago was just that.

its great to be reminded of it again - thanks!

L

LeonWhite

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Reply with quote  #26 
By the by, the first time I heard of ted was from Jay Graydon, to whom I'll always be indebted. He was insistent that I go Ted.

Thanks Jay!

L
earsoup

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Reply with quote  #27 
Yeah it's outlined in Chord chemistry with "O Come, all ye faithful".
Deparko

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Reply with quote  #28 
First time I heard Ted was when I started taking lessons around 1973.  I just graduated from high school.  I had heard about him for about a year prior. I had one friend (Kevin Hallowen) take some lessons and a guitarist (Jeff Grant) that I was in a band with at the time said he heard a tape of Ted playing lead and he sounded like a Sax.  His reputation at the time was already big.  After hearing about him, I just had to go seek him and when I finally met him...WOW..I think its fair he has had a major impact on me.

Also I agree with Dan that Ted changed his pedagogic technique. I took lessons both in the 70's and then in the 90's.  With me in the 70's,  he did not really want to go into blues, single lines and really popular music.  I tried as a kid to have him teach me hot licks, the blues..etc but he was not into it so I eventually dropped it and became a student.  I actually remember some conversations where he told me that some types of music was "Dark" music, not positive and scary and he wanted no part of it. We spent a lot of time on systematic inversions and triads..etc.

When I came back in the 90's he was a lot more flexible or tolerant of my musical diversions.  I think the thing that strikes me the most is that even though his teaching style changed his total focus on teaching did not.  He was always 120% engaged in helping me become a better guitarist and musician.

Mark



FenderBender

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Reply with quote  #29 
I actually first heard of Ted by an accident. I was heavily into Be-bop at the time and when I was looking to learn some interesting chord inversions and single note licks, I Googled said parameters and Ted's name popped up through my research. I looked at the books and thought of getting them, but in looking at the previews I figured there was too much there that I wouldnt understand without the knowledge of theory and the ability to read music. (I have begun guitar lessons after all these years of not doing so, and look forward to reading music at the level of "feel ability" I feel I have achieved through self teaching)
My teacher asked me what I wanted to learn and I told him that I had heard of this cat, Ted Greene, and I wanted to know how he did what he did. He told me to brace myself and he would show me what Ted was doing.
Lets just say that the first lesson is still challenging me and coming and finding this site is really kicking my butt! I can only use the chord grid tunes for now, until I can properly read music, but those alone are enough to keep me content. I followed in Ted's footsteps by playing solo and backing female vocalists, which was always a favorite of mine. (Thanks to Joe Pass and Ella Fitzgerald) I look forward to having more knowledge and being able to use it in ways that Ted would approve of. I watch him for inspiration almost daily and I cant wait to get my hands on a Telecaster someday. For now, the Ibanez hollow will have to do the trick. Thanks over and over to Ted and especially to Barbara and all the students here that are furthering Ted's legacy. God, its good to know that Im not the only one who cares about music.

1967

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Reply with quote  #30 
I first met Ted at Ernie Ball Guitar shop in 1966 or ?? Dale Zdenek was the owner--He was the best, always trying to help people advance in their lives. I started taking lessons and the teacher happened to be Ted--They were great times, studying Eric Clapton and (of course) Ted's solo of Danny Boy. He showed me the Rock and Blues stuff but I guess he wanted to get away from giving those kinds of lessons. Then he moved to "The Third Eye" store on Ventura Blvd. and I followed him there. Does anyone remember Ted at the Third Eye--1968.  I remember a "blacklight room" and the guitarist from "The Turtles" having the lesson before me.  
Frank D

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