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TLerch

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #1 
Here is a video I made of Ted's G Blues sheet from 1978. it's posted in the lessons section under Blues/Jazz and has been discussed on the forum recently. I made it hoping it would be helpful to folks who are new to Ted's teaching, thinking it would be helpful to hear and see it played. Barbara if you think it isn't appropriate to post here I would be happy to remove it. If people find it helpful I'd be happy (and challenged) to post more.


with respect to Ted's great teaching

Tim Lerch

barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #2 
Bravo Tim Lerch!  My guess is that many will find this most valuable! Thank you for your thoughtfulness, time and effort in your attempt to benefit other students. I think it's great!  Barbara

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Barbara Franklin
wkriski

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for posting this. Great to see your explanations and demonstrations of what is on the sheet music. Gives me even more motivation to learn this stuff!
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Zorshelter

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you very much, this is a great job you have done, showing us how to play this blues prog, love your sound and your "embellished" version
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #5 
Great job, Tim!
Nice feel, good tone, explanation and overall presentation.
Yes, do more!
--Paul

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TLerch

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks guys. I'd be happy to try and do some more, perhaps the next one can be the Bb blues on the same page.
take care
Tim


Zorshelter

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Reply with quote  #7 
It would be nice, it's really inspiring
Sammo

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Reply with quote  #8 
Awesome Tim!!

I am big fan of your youtube videos (I ordered second Ethos with TLE/Classic switch mainly because of your vid) and live stuff w/John Stowell. Everybody should  look them up! 

Thank you for being inspiration,
Sampo (from Finland) 
GregB

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Posts: 118
Reply with quote  #9 
Since this youtube video and practice page were announced here I've been practicing it almost daily.  Here's my thoughts on the piece and I hope it's useful to others.

The first stumbling block was that half step approach Db to C (3rd chord to 4th chord).  It's such an awkward chord for me because it's not close to any of the other chord shapes I play.  But I love the sound of it so I'm trying to use it in other tunes.

The 2nd G7 in the 3rd bar is a bear. So I think of it as an Bb 6th with the root moved up one fret and I play it fingered that way as well with 2 1 4 3 low to high.

The series of C9 and C7 chords in measure 5 is awesome and I've completely stolen that riff.   I also love adding the III chord to do a III VI II V instead of a more typical I VI II V.  There were a lot of iii vi ii V changes in MCP and as I was playing them they didn't sound familiar to me.  But now that I hear it in context it feels more comfortable.

Measure 10 to the G6 in measure 11 is now the hard part for me.  But it did show me an example of something that was in Chord Chemistry.  There's an Am7 in measure 10 that is a shape that I think of as a C6.  But I remember Ted writing about that shape and how if you think of the low E string as the root it's a 6th.  But if you think of the D string as a root it's the m7.  That Am7 is a perfect example of that.

And that brought me back to the 2nd G7 in measure3.  If I played it like an Bb6 but think of the D string as the root it would be a Gm7.  But then I moved that low E string note up one fret which changed it from minor to major.  Hence, it is now G7.  It also makes it a B[something] chord.  I should analyze that and figure out what other homonyms it has.

It's a great blues.  I'm really enjoying it and I find that my playing is really moving forward since I've found this web site.  I needed something to kick start my playing and get it out of my old familiar ruts and this kind of lesson is doing that.  Ted's books intimidated me for decades.  Only recently have I picked them up again and start practicing from them. But now I "get it". Now it's making sense to me.  Now it's fun instead of scary.


The last two chords have wonderful harmonies as well.  The D7b9+ to the G7/6 sound wonderful.  But I often switch the G7/6 to a G9 so instead of x 8 9 9 8 x I play x 8 9 9 10 x.  And THAT little change made me realize a cool little chord shape thing.  G6 is x 10 9 9 8 x  But the "mirror image" of that is x 8 9 9 10 x which is G9.  It's just a cool little bit of topography on the neck that sounds good and looks logical.



wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #10 
Great thread! I'd like to echo some of the challenges for me as well as what Greg said. For the Db to C you can just practice it or use a 'standard' Db7 to C7 at the 9th/8th fret (play the root, min7 and 3rd on 6/4/3 strings). I agree with the G7 as well - you can play it without the G on the D string (3 note chord) or keep working at it.

These are definitely more doable chords than some of the other tunes that have insane stretches (especially with my ongoing hand issues). With knowledge of chord inversions and theory you can usually find alternate chords that are easier to play but still reflect the original intention of the tune. There's no shame in that IMO.

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GregB

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Posts: 118
Reply with quote  #11 
You think YOU have hand issues

Go to this page http://gbguitars.com/lessons.html and take a close look at my right hand.

Notice anything, uh, different?

Then again, I've learned to cope with it.  And at least it's my right hand.  My step brother is missing the same finger on his left hand and he plays bass!  We all make due with what life gives us.



wkriski

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Reply with quote  #12 
Way to persevere. Good advice!
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armia741

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thank you very much, this is a great job you have done, showing us how to play this blues prog, love your sound and your "embellished" version
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