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maclaks

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Reply with quote  #16 

"fear vs. ear' slow ya grove down and listen cause its all about gravity. kinda neat though,  when play it front to back...........flip the dam book over and play it backwards.

KASHI

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #17 
Hi again.  Does anyone has the chord progressions  recorded in a nice quality or any quality at all, for practice purposes. I know that I should record the progressions myself but I don't have  where to do this.  Thanks for everything, and check  Barbara's Book

http://www.amazon.com/My-Life-Chord-Chemist-Apotheosis/dp/1449575579/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259799228&sr=8-1
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #18 
You might invest in the software "Band-in-a-Box" that can create backing tracks with some very good samples.  There's plenty of BIAB files already available for many standard tunes, and you can create your own as well (in case you can't find "Red River Valley" in the Real Book!)
--Paul


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barbarafranklin

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Reply with quote  #19 
Regarding Kashi's request for taped chord progressions.  Kashi does not have a tape recorder and has no way of recording these progressions for practicing.  If I could play the guitar (sob), I would do this for him and send them along.
Is there anyone willing to make a tape for Kashi?  'Twould be a small act of kindness from someone who has the heart and the time.   Thanks in advance.

And thanks Kashi for the "reminder" about the book.    Barbara


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Barbara Franklin
Stringfellow

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Reply with quote  #20 
What actually is it that you would like Kashi? What format can you play back any backing tracks in? I have some time over Xmas so might be able to help you out a little.

Tris

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String
KASHI

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #21 
OH THANKS! well  I can  playback (mp3,wma,aac,) the more common files. I'm also thinking about Band in a Box but I've never used it before (and I don't have a personal computer right now).   What I want is to have some nice sounding chords for the exercises  in SNS vol.1 (and vol.2 in the future) I will  burn a cd with the files and use my Tascam CD- Trainer , I do recommend this helpful Tool.
   Thanks a Lot for your kindness. 

Stringfellow

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Reply with quote  #22 
Hi Kashi. I'm a bit confused - does this mean you now have things sorted at your end? I'm happy to help, but if you have access to a cd player and can afford them, the jamey Abersold books and CD's are excellent 'backing' tracks for practising over. Try Vol. 1 (How to Play & Improvise Jazz) Vol.3 (II-V-I's) and Vol.54 (Maiden Voyage). Maiden Voyage includes actual standards and is a bit more like 'proper' music. The II-V-I's are particularly relevant to Ted's SNS book 1. These will keep you busy for a good long while!

I hope this helps - give me a shout if you're still stuck.

Tris


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KASHI

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Reply with quote  #23 
Hey friends.     Happy new year to all.  I'm sorry I wasn't able to reply earlier since  I got the "Influenza" I was really really sick, but now I'm banging a new Godin kingpin II,  not a Guild, not a Gibson, but it sounds good and was really cheap. also  a Good Friend of mine is  on vacation and now I have his Tele.     well  I have to Thank Charles, Tris and Paul for their advice.  I come from a classical background so bear with me. I have a Passion for Tone and for jazz ballads.   my intention is to use the SNS in the best possible way, and  my main concern isn't precisely the progressions since I was able to find vol.3 of Aebersold.    I would really like to have  some nice chords for practice purposes and i mean  the  sounds and tonalities that  Ted wanted us to hear over such  major, minor and dominant chords.   so if anyone records  the chords of sns 1 and send them to me I'll be greatful, it sounds lazy but I'm planning on getting a nice recording rig sometime later in the year.   thanks to all.
wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #24 
I'd suggest band in a box as you mentioned, you can type in one chord and have it play ad nauseum. Until that time look for an easy way to record your guitar playing a chord like recording into your computer, using a camcorder playing a chord for a while, iphone (records audio) or even some free services like recording your guitar over the phone (you can google it).

For some reason I wasn't able to absorb most of the material in SNS into my playing, but I think Ted had the right idea about learning lines and combining them.

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GregB

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Reply with quote  #25 
I'd like to revive this old thread and share some of my practice techniques.

I like to practice improvising by doing something which is essentially the opposite of improvising.  I think of each new phrase I learn as a new word in my vocabulary.  Just as there are words which I can use in several different ways I try to use my phrases in different ways.

Here's what that means in practice.  Let's say we just learned a new phrase which works over a ii V progression. I think of that as a new vocabulary word.  I'll take a song and start to improvise over it and when I get to a ii V I'll force my new word into that location.  What happens is that I end up trying to create a musical idea to lead into the new word as well as leading out of that new word.

Now let's say I have a cool ii V I phrase.  That contains a ii V a subset of the ii V I.  I'll see if I can replace the ii V part of my ii V I phrase with my new ii V phrase.

This sounds counter intuitive because you're doing the opposite of improvisation.  You're actually saying "I'm going to force this phrase into that part of the song. However, the next step is to find another ii V "word" and replace the first ii V "word" with your new ii V "word".

I also try to take my new vocabulary word and see if I it makes sense to play it backwards.  Does it make sense to play it inside out?  Can I get 2 or 3 phrases out of my new vocabulary "word".

You may think that this is no longer improvisation, it's just playing riffs. But at some point you're ear starts taking over because you're not just playing riffs, you're learning what those riffs sound like.  There is a point where you have so many riffs in your head that you're no longer playing riffs, you're connecting ideas.   What number is "enough" so you're no longer playing riffs?  It may be 20 for some people. It may be 50, or 100, or 200.  But each one of those riffs starts off by forcing it into a song to see how it fits and what it sounds like.

Once you're at this point you become a "riff collector".  Everything you listen to or read in a book (like Ted's single note solo book) becomes a source for new riffs or new vocabulary words.

I actually gave a seminar at the Auburn Bluegrass Festival a couple of years go on how to use this technique in a bluegrass style.  I called the seminar "How to increase your bluegrass vocabulary".

****
As far as Band in a Box goes my new favorite practice tool is a Boss Micro Br.  I can simply record myself playing the chords of a tune at whatever speed I want to practice.  Then I can solo over it to my heart's content.

wkriski

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Reply with quote  #26 
Great post Greg. There are a lot of misconceptions about what improvisation really is probably because people like to present a mysterious 'I don't know where it comes from' approach, or they haven't thought about how they were able to improvise.

I recently went to jazz college to study improv. Unfortunately it didn't work for me - taking someone who doesn't speak a language and giving him scales/modes/analysis plus an overwhelming ton of things to practice (not to mention non-related elective courses) in the hopes that he creates his own improvisation, doesn't make any sense to me and didn't work. We all improvise when we talk even though we started out mimicking our parents. Imitation, assimilation, then innovation.

Ted himself mentions in some of his videos that improvisation is essentially combining things that have been previously practiced. And by practicing the lines in the single note solo books, Ted says you will eventually connect and twist them in your own way.

Luckily I also found Robert Conti and his website a while back. His approach is two stage. First he removes a lot of fear and intimidation that is common when learning jazz. Stage one is learn these solos note for note, get them under your fingers. There are 3 solos to learn. Then, in the fourth tune he cuts and pastes phrases from the first three. Some are altered to fit the chord (moved up or down the neck, played in a different position, etc). Stage 2 is learning how it works (he sees everything as 'one' using the IV chord shape for his lines and superimposing them over ii-Vs (eg. Fmaj7 lines over Dm7-G7), or for alterations use the bVI eg. Abmaj7 lines over G7)

I'm not sure if you heard about Giant Steps but Coltrane was wailing over the tune and Tommy Flanagan on piano had a terrible time because he hadn't worked on those progressions (moving in major 3rds) at the time of recording. That pretty much says it all.

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GregB

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Reply with quote  #27 
Is the Robert Conti DVD you're talking about the "Ticket to Improv" DVD?  I looked it up and it looks good.

Re: Giant Steps, yeah, it's often been said that when they recorded it Coltrane was the only person on the planet who could play it. And that included his band!



wkriski

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Reply with quote  #28 
yes that's the one. i bought pretty much everything he has now.
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GregB

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Reply with quote  #29 
By the way, I saw Tommy Flanagan play at a hotel bar in La Jolla California years ago.  Tommy is one of many musicians who really doesn't like hearing a lot of audience noise when he's performing (and I agree, I came to hear him.  Not the conversation behind me)

There was a table at the back laughing it up and having a fun (and very loud) time.  After one of the songs Tommy turned to his microphone and asked "Excuse me, but can you folks at the back hear me alright?"

They answered "Yeah!"

To which Tommy replied "Because I can sure as hell hear you!"


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