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skotrock

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Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #1 
I have Both volumes of this book, and there seem to be a million ways that you could work through them. How have y'all done this, especially students of Ted.
Sometimes I feel like I'm trying to be too thorough, and wasting a lot of time, when I could be practicing more precisely and efficiently.Thanks for any input, y'all

Stringfellow

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #2 

Good idea..........

I think this could be a really useful thread for any players who have worked with these two books over the years - always interesting and helpful to hear different players points of view - especially by the really long-term serious players. Personally I have lived with these two books (this is a guitar geek site isn't it?!!) for many years now and have played through most of the examples, arps, scales, exercises etc. (but not ALL the melodic patterns!!) and experimented with various ideas and applications. There is no doubt in my mind that there is alot of material to absorb here if you want to be thorough. It would be great to hear what players that have 'come out the otherside' of all this material, think now they have made the trip!

So, I just trod the long road of working step by step through the examples, absorbing the sounds and trying to apply them in any real world situation I could. Bearing in mind though that these books were only a part of my musical studies at the time (others inc. guitar lessons, music college, gigging, jamming, tonnes of other books etc. etc.) but I would say that Ted's books are the most in depth that I have worked through regards guitar stoof. However, I haven't touched George Van Eps books yet!!!

I hope, and therefore look forward to hearing other players thoughts on this.

String


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Stringfellow

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #3 

Obviously just me on this one then!! Pity, but no worries.

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skotrock

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Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #4 
If you type it, they will come.
tedstafford

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Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #5 
I'm totally psyched to see this thread here and sad to see no further posts...so I thought I'd throw in my two cents.

I didn't know Ted personally, but I've been studying the single note soloing books for about 13 years (read: I've read all the text of both books many times over and internalized the first half of book I). Every time I return to these books I have another "I get it now" moment and make it a bit farther. Here's the latest:

The other night, after reading the beginning of this thread, I was revisiting the very first examples of Dmajor chord family licks and for the first time I was able to simultaneously visualize the fretboard, see the notes on the staff, say the names of the notes and their scale degrees. I've played through these runs many times looking for their secret and now I think I've got a plan to follow in my next jaunt through the book. It's no longer about technique, (that's great, too), it's about absolutely knowing where the chord tones are anywhere on the neck and being able to grab them in any position. In short, my advice to any guitarist just getting into these books is: spend the time getting familiar with the arpeggios, scale forms and chord forms in each position. Be aware of what notes you are playing and where they are placed in the measure--especially the more "out" tones.

As a long-time student of these books I would be most interested in hearing other opinions on how to approach the material and how Ted taught the material.

Thanks,
ted stafford


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Stringfellow

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Reply with quote  #6 

Yeehaa! Cheers Ted - great to hear your thoughts. I second what you say regarding knowing the chord tones. I would add to this some ear training stuff too. For example, play a D maj7 and then sing the chord tones, then the 9th, 11th(will clash with the 3rd)and 13th etc, whilst seeing the note in my mind on a visualised stave. I find this helps link the visual, audio and 'thinking' stuff altogether.

Regards the runs, I would analyse and play each one, finding that after a few months your finger memory kicks in (as with any licks you practise) and they almost 'play by themselves'. Ted refers to this as osmosis I think! Then just hours of experimenting and jamming!

Hope this helps someone a bit but would be very interested to hear the thoughts of some of Ted's students. For example, did he supplement this sort of material with anything in particular during lessons? Of course, I would be interested to hear the views of any guitarists though...........

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skotrock

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Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #7 
I have found volume 1 helping me out the in the way of ear training. Instead of the more common way of using a whole scale to solo on and having to sort out the sound of the individual notes over time, Ted catagorizes it in a more logical way. By starting with the Maj7 chord tones, you get used to the sound of these, and then go on to add the 6 chord tone- it will then stick out a bit, allowing you to identify it a bit more. And then add the 9th, etc. At least this is how I've gotten the most out of it. So far
MrGuitar

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #8 
Maybe in about 20 years when I have started to get a grasp on all the concepts presented in Chord Chemistry, I can move on to working on Single Note Soloing. Hell, in 100 years or so, I imagine I'll be a pretty complete player!
skotrock

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Posts: 100
Reply with quote  #9 
I hear ya!
tedstafford

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Reply with quote  #10 
I've been many years absorbing Chord Chemistry, too. I wouldn't wait to explore SNS 1. It helps identify the chord tones! Plus, the chord boxes in SNS 1 & 2 (not to mention the scale and arpeggio diagrams) are a great resource. I found it helped to contextualize the scads of chords in the reference charts. Then, to see it all in action...check out Modern Chord Progressions vol. 1!
There is so ^%&$*# much to learn.
best,
ted


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ChemicalChords

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Posts: 78
Reply with quote  #11 
Im Still trying to figure out a methodical productive way to study Single note soloing and chord chemistry. Im trying right now to apply the musical notation in the key of D to the fretboard because I have a problem playing music in positions other then the first position and it gets stressful because I feel like I flubbed on some fundamental I should have throughly studied before moving into this arena. I got these books about 2 months ago and Im still studying the first page of solos in sns. I want to be able to read the notes instead of looking at the fret position numbers. If any one has any good advice please do. Thanks

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YoungBlood

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Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #12 
SNS Vol.1 was the book that got me into chord tones, and the whole "Major, Minor or Dominant" way of thinking. If you see a D/9 chord, you don't HAVE to play a D/9 arpeggio, but you can also play a D6/9 arpeggio, or a Dmaj9 arpeggio.
This book, along with SNS Vol. 2 have chords in them that Chord Chemistry do not. So, you can get a few more colors in there that are not found in Chord Chemistry.
I love the arpeggio diagrams that Ted used for both volumes, easy to read. But furthermore, there are so many of them. Especially as you get to the bigger chords like a G13- he listed about 20 arpeggios for just one single position! Ted really did not leave any stone unturned.
I like to read through the staffs, kind of memorize the lines without having my instrument in my hands. This way, it helps my reading ability, and kind of makes me think on my own, as if I were playing onstage. Or even gets my brain juices flowing for when I may play onstage later that night.



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midivox

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Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #13 
Hi All,
    I run into world famous musicians every now and then, once in a Blue Moon, one  gets really upset if you say you studied Jazz Guitar with Ted Greene. They claim because he preferred teaching to doing studio work or playing single note improvs on the jazz circuit, that Ted was not a Jazz Guitarist and knew nothing about playing jazz.

    Ted could play anything in any style made famous by anyone with a guitar. I would try to find some jazz guitarist he had never heard of, but he would always start playing something in their style and then explain, heres how you learn how to do that.

    Ted was the best single solo improvisor I have ever heard, and I have heard almost everyone of note live at one time or another the last few decades. There is a lot of great stuff in the single note books.

Happy Guitars
MidiVox

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rafikenn

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Posts: 72
Reply with quote  #14 
some tips i picked up from ted which i hope will help;
look at the spaces,ruther than frets.note,4 spaces
on adjacent strings,for unison.[besides 2nd 3rd strings,3spaces]
study the keys chromatically,compare.i.e. imagine c had 7 natural sines,
cb 7 flats,c# 7 sharps..another example,Emajor has 1,4,5 natural
Eb 1,4,5 are flat,that should eliminate the b,#phobia..  realize the parallel
nature of the guitar[how the relations of shapes to intervals are maintained]
this coupled with a study of first and last positions,can free you from keeping
the mental front allways active;checkout dan sindels first lesson,learn to see
the 5 ereas of the fretboard,than start with 2,3 notes,repeat them while changing positions[with the 5 ereas in mind];learn to sing the chords!,this gets easy pretty quick,just sing the intervals..of course you can do it away from the instrument. learn the scales from the middle.,you'll notice the intervalic design form 1 to 4 is identical to 5 to 8 in major,phrigian,etc.
remember almost all we do to bring chords to life from paper is 1,chords extantions and substitutes;2,motion 3,quality change.
                 play with the thumb!
onelove from india,ted's friend ,rafi.
KASHI

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #15 

  I'M LOOKING FOR  ARPEGGIOS, PHRASES AND LICKS.  ANYTHING IS HELPFUL.  

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