PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

VISIT OUR NEW SUPPORT PORTAL
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Tass

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 

Hey guys my question is very simple so I'm going to make this quick. 

ok so in Ted Greene's Autumn leaves Trascription on bar 14 Ted goes from an A7 to an A7b9+. The way this chord is written to be played is with a high G at the top which then goes the a high F. Now this fingering is impossible to play. I saw someone who did a cover of this go instead from a F to and E which is playable. Could somone help me? Could it be just a typo?

PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,670
Reply with quote  #2 
HI Tass,
I took a look at the A7b9+ in measure 14 that you mentioned.  It is playable if you finger it as follows:
From the 5th string upward:  fingers 1, 2, 1, 3, 4. 
Then the F note is played again with the 4th finger.

Depending on your guitar, it may be more or less difficult to do a clean barre with the 1st finger. 
I can do it on my Tele-style guitar, but it is a challenge.

This arrangement is very difficult but doable if you put in the time. 
Good luck!

One musical technical point: for that A7b9+ chord:  the F note should really be notated as an E#, since it is the sharp 5th of the A chord.

If this chord posses too many problems for you I'd suggest working out the move with different but similar chord(s).

__________________
--Paul
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,670
Reply with quote  #3 
Here's a couple of alternate ways to play that passage using different chords.  Version 1 uses string transference to move the same notes that Ted used, but putting them on a different string set to make them easier to finger.
Version 2 uses two different voicings of the A7b9+ chord, using the systematic inversion method.

Both sound pretty good to my ears.
Hope they do the trick for you.

 
Attached Files
pdf Autumn Leaves, TGArr, 1992-02-22 (noteGrids), p.2 - Alt Chords.pdf (156.03 KB, 15 views)


__________________
--Paul

barbaralovedcats

Registered:
Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #4 

Hi Paul. Your reply is akin to Ted's spirit. Even I appreciate your answer very much.

Please let me know if this post is in the wrong place.

Also, Steve Herberman, who wrote a wonderful tribute to Ted that Barbara posted on her on her beautiful Ted Greene Archive - Immortalizing beauty through music-

https://tedgreenearchive.wordpress.com/?s=steve+herberman

has kindly, over the years, created some tutorials at Mike's Masterclasses (there are three so far) that truly shed some very bright light on the Baroque style improvising that all of us (or most of us) in TG land are so grateful for and which Ted clearly loved and improvised so beautifully.  Steve has shared quite generously the audio/video recorded lessons he had taken with Ted right here in TG land - and it is in the audio video footage where Ted mentioned to Steve the importance of IV-V-I cadences.  As can be seen on these wonderful shared videos of his lessons with Ted, Steve mentioned something about I-IV-V, and Ted responded immediately, "Ah, Bach did IV-V-I. That is the way, more so than I-IV-V."

Getting back on track here, I want to let all here in TG land know that Steve Herberman has three video/pdf offerings on how to improvise Baroque - even on the fly....if one wants to do that. Ted did that. For those who are interested in this musical adventure of a lifetime, if you go to Mike's Masterclasses, you'll see Steve's 3 very generous and practical musical Ted-like offerings for playing Baroque on the Guitar.  https://mikesmasterclasses.com
I believe you won't be let down if interested in playing Bach-like improvisations all day and night. The classes are about $25 or $30 dollars each (or something like that) and I believe they will provide a lifetime of Baroque enjoyment - which Ted unequivocally loved.
Tass

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulV
Here's a couple of alternate ways to play that passage using different chords.  Version 1 uses string transference to move the same notes that Ted used, but putting them on a different string set to make them easier to finger.
Version 2 uses two different voicings of the A7b9+ chord, using the systematic inversion method.

Both sound pretty good to my ears.
Hope they do the trick for you.


Such insightful answers! Thank you so very much 
RobertS

Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #6 
What a great quality answer Paul.

BarbaraLovedCats--> great tip - thxs very much for passing this along. This is a great example of the richness of these forums - not necessarily the most chatty forum on the internet, but very dense in quality [wink]

Under transcriptions, there is the Will Kriski's transcription of this TG video section where Ted talks and plays such IV, V, I baroque patterns. Ive spent hours in that small section (page 8/9 of Will's transcription). Sounds like the Steve Herberman lessons offer hours and hours more into this area of study.

I wonder if Ted knew of Silvius Leopold Weiss who appears to have been a contemporary of J.S. Bach. Weiss seems to have been to lute improv what Bach was on to organ improv. I've been looking but havent yet found a decent biography book on Weiss.

thanks to all contributors to this great TG.com world!

Robert
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE