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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #76 

Since we have an interest in dominant 7#9 chords, here's another excerpt from Ted's "Learning to Use Altered Dominants...1986-05-28"

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jpeg Learning_to_Use_Altered_Dominants...1986-05-28,_Excerpt_4.jpg (44.05 KB, 15 views)


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goldglob

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Reply with quote  #77 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulVachon

Since we have an interest in dominant 7#9 chords, here's another excerpt from Ted's "Learning to Use Altered Dominants...1986-05-28"



Again, "Someday My Prince Will Come", but this time with the more usual bass notes. Elegant.
earsoup

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Reply with quote  #78 
Thanks for this thread. These little harmonic gems are a treat.
barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #79 
I'm completely in agreement with the sentiments of earsoup e.g. that this thread is just what some of us needed in order to FINALLY start digging what is going on in those "Learning to Use Altered Dominants....." pages that Ted "composed."  Goldglob's contributions here are a treat too, in my opinion.   

TLerch

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Reply with quote  #80 
Hi Guys,
I made a short lesson video on Teds chord move of the day from a few days ago. thought some might find it helpful.
all the best
Tim
barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #81 
Hearing those beautiful harmonies played with your musicality, tone and care is a pleasure.    It was generous and caring of you to provide some ideas for use and embellishment as well as examples of application.   Some of your pointers made me think I was experiencing a reunion of Ted, You and Ted's sheet which can be found here in TG land under the moniker Melodic Chord Streams- minor 7th ala George Van Eps (1978-09-16),   Keep 'em coming   :-)

Thank you very kindly.
 
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #82 
An Excerpt from Ted's "Expanded Diatonicism, Introduction, Ext on bIII & bVII, 1989-07-17"
This is a diatonic example....nothing "expanded" on this one, but let's give some names to this and fingerings for these, especially the last three chords.

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jpeg Expanded_Diatonicism,_Introduction,_Ext_on_bIII_&_bVII,...17,_Excerpt_3.jpg (36.39 KB, 21 views)


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barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #83 
Ted said something about there being no mystery here, yet it's all mystery.   I'd like to ask for some help on this one.  What is the point of these Expanded Diatonicism lessons?    Goldglob?  Anyone? 

Thanks. 

barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #84 
I don't have any suggestions for fingerings.   However, I do have a guess for the chord names: 

AM to G#m7 to F#m9 to B7 (6/11) to EM7(9) 

I think of this as see this in the key of E, as Ted pointed out on his sheet,  and moving down diatonically in Emajor as IV to iii to ii to V7 to I

Is anyone willing to offer any comments on whether the bIII and bVII referred to in the title of the page could possibly referring to diatonic chords/triads of another key with the same root and picking and using chords from that other key for use in the original key.  for instance, since we are in E major with this example we could pick and choose the bIII major and bVII major triads from the keys of E natural minor and / or E dorian minor and use them in the key of E major to expand the "diatonic" possibilities of E major. And vice versa too????- for instance, use the III m7 from E major instead the bIII major in the keys of E natural or E dorian minor, or use the vii dim triad from the key of E major for the bVII major triad in the keys of E natural minor and/ or E dorian minor. 

Thanks in advance for any comments.  
AsatBluesboy

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Reply with quote  #85 
My fingering suggestion

-----4--3-(3)-2--
--1--1--1--4--4--
--2--1--1--1--1--
-----1--1--------
--3--------1-----
--1--1--1-----0--

This is not a tablature. Numbers represent fingers and lines represent strings. The last Emaj9 chord is like tablature by accident ;-).

So as you can hopefully see, I would bar my index finger for the first four chords.

Greets Christoph
barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #86 
The fingering you shared "Makes sense to me"  - The quotation is what Ted said to GVE in the course of the TED/GVE interiew where GVE said something like "I was trying to make my brain sharper, NOT duller" and then Ted unleashes that by now famous quote "Makes sense to me."   


PaulV

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Reply with quote  #87 

From "Descending Chromatic Bass Progressions, 1987-01-10"
We're gonna need some chord names and functions (Roman numerals) for these guys.

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jpeg Descending_Chromatic_Bass_Progressions,_1987-01-10,_Excerpt_3.jpg (31.64 KB, 12 views)


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barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #88 
Guessing -

1st chord - ii in key of Amajor:  Bm7/A in bass    same as root position Bm triad with A in the bass 

2nd chord - V in key of A major (or tritone sub):  E7(#5#9) No Root or Bb7/6 w/ 9th in bass  No Root

3rd chord - V in key of A major (or tritone sub):   E7#5 No Root or Bb7#5 w/ 9th in bass  No Root

4th chord - I in key of A major:    A major sus2.     It appears to be an open voice A major triad that could have been opened up by lowering by one octave the 3rd (C#) of the root position close voice A major triad and then adding the B note on D string. The result from lowest to highest pitches 3rd, Root, 2nd, 5th)

Thanks, the 2 crunchy tacos were great and very appreciated
James

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Reply with quote  #89 
I agree with BLC's analysis, except BLC meant to say "A triad with the 2nd in the 2nd HIGHEST voice" and if you analyzed the dominants from Bb they have the b7 in the bass.
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #90 
Shouldn't the first chord be written as a "ii in the key of A", not a II ?
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