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goldglob

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulVachon
I like the sound of this move of E to E7 to A back to E with an ascending bass line (with a C7 snuck in there).
You might find it easier to finger the final E chord with the B on the 6th string instead of the 5th string....unless you intend to follow through to the next phrase.  In that case, the finger is perfect, albeit a bit "stretchy."
It's from "Happy Days Are Here Again"


Yes, beautiful clear voice leading.
Worth noting that the C7 is a fine example of the classical German Sixth chord leading to tonic in second inversion, and is a more 'dramatic' sounding substitution for the usual (in a jazz context) A#dim7 found in this sort of move.
James

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Worth noting that the C7 is a fine example of the classical German Sixth chord leading to tonic in second inversion, and is a more 'dramatic' sounding substitution for the usual (in a jazz context) A#dim7 found in this sort of move.


That's a very intersting observation, goldglob.  Ted often used what he called "approach chords," which include a dominant on bVI.  But like you said, here he is using a classical German augmented sixth chord and following classical voice leading: scale degree #4 moves up (A# to B) and scale degree b6 moves down (C to B) while the other voices hold constant.  It is in "inversion" since a normal German augmented sixth (so named because of the interval between C and A#) would have C in the bass.  (Most classical composers would spell the chord with an A# note because of the voice leading but spelling with a Bb note is consistent with jazz harmony and with the fact that a German augmented sixth chord is enharmonic with a dominant seventh chord.)

Although Ted sometimes uses classical voice leading, this specific example of an inverted German augmented sixth does seem to be a rarity for Ted.
goldglob

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Reply with quote  #33 
Yes, it's a move worth keeping in mind. It crops up quite a bit in sheet music of standards but is often ignored in simplified 'real book' changes. We should keep these delicacies alive.
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #34 
From "Happy Days are Here Again"

For what it's worth, I finger this:

For the B:  1, 4, 2, 1 then 3, 4, 2, 1.  This allows the top F# note to sustain, and the finger is smooth.

E6:  2, 3, 1, 1 then add 4 on the D#.  You could also do a double-stop on the 6th and 5th strings with the second finger.

C7:  2, 3, 4.  Fingers 2 and 4 from the previous chord simply more up one fret.  Smooth.

B7sus: 1, 1, 4, 1.  Of course finger 4 stays put from the previous chord.  
The X'd note is not notated in this example.  You'll need to go to the full version in my "From Students" section:
http://www.tedgreene.com/fromstudents/HappyDaysAreHereAgain.asp

Attached Images
jpeg Happy_Days_are_Here_Again,_excerpt,_m19.jpg (40.01 KB, 14 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #35 
From Ted's page on "Diatonic Contrary Motion Progressions, 1992-05-09"
Can't say I care for the Bb (non-diatonic) note on the second to last chord - making it a E7b5.
To me it sounds a bit too altered for this passage....but maybe you'll like it (I guess Ted did).

Anyone care to go ahead and name the implied chord names?

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jpeg Diatonic_Contrary_Motion_Progressions,_1992-05-09,_Excerpt_2.jpg (47.44 KB, 18 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #36 
From Ted's "Learning to Use Altered Dominants..." 1986-05-28

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jpeg Learning_to_Use_Altered_Dominants...1986-05-28,_Excerpt_2.jpg (38.88 KB, 15 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #37 
I like this little guy....
Excerpt from "Harmonic Vocabulary, 1984-07-18"

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goldglob

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulVachon
I like this little guy....
Excerpt from "Harmonic Vocabulary, 1984-07-18"


Beautiful. Almost a Metheny-esque cowboy movie thing to it.
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #39 
From "Descending Chromatic Bass Progressions, 1987-01-10"
Someone please give these lonely chords a name, and possibly a harmonic function (Roman numeral).

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jpeg Descending_Chromatic_Bass_Progressions,_1987-01-10,_Excerpt_5.jpg (29.14 KB, 12 views)


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AsatBluesboy

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Reply with quote  #40 
My guess:

Gm7 (rootless with fifth in the bass)
C7b9 (with b9 in the bass)
Fmaj7 (again rootless with fifth in the bass)

Roman Numerals should be obvious, if it is analyzed this way: iim7 - V7 - Imaj7

Regards Christoph
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #41 
I agree with your names, Christoph.  
Another possibility, though taking a different road, would be to it Bb - Bbdim\9 - Am (or Fmaj7), - which sounds pretty cool too.  
Try that same progression in root position: Bb,F,D  to  Bb,G,Db  to  A,E,C  (or A,F,C for an F major at the end). 
I'll bet that Ted would say the Bbdim is functioning as the V7b9.  
But I can also hear it as a Bbm6 or iv.  (But that doesn't hold in Ted's example because it has the E note in there).


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #42 
"Expanded Diatonicism, Introduction, Extensions on bIII & bVII, 1989-07-17"

Try phrasing it like Lenny...melody followed by chord.  Or try playing the notes with the right hand fingers as "teams" as Ted called them, and as he learned from George Van Eps.

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jpeg Expanded_Diatonicism,_Introduction,_Ext_on_bIII_&_bVII,...17,_Excerpt_1.jpg (36.32 KB, 17 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #43 
Another one from Ted's "Harmonic Vocabulary, 1984-07-18"

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jpeg Harmonic_Vocabulary,_1984-07-18,_Excerpt_1.jpg (40.83 KB, 17 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #44 

From "Learning to Use Altered Dominants...1986-05-28"
This one sounds like it could be the end tag of a TV sitcom. [smile]

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jpeg Learning_to_Use_Altered_Dominants...1986-05-28,_Excerpt_1.jpg (42.36 KB, 13 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #45 
Here's another excerpt from Ted's "Aura Lee" arrangement.  Notation plus newly added grids.

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jpeg Aura_Lee,_excerpt_2.jpg (43.93 KB, 15 views)


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