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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #16 
Here's something from Ted's "Happy Days are Here Again," measure 14.
I tried moving it around the neck, and it is very doable without the open strings (but maybe without the sustained top note on the third chord).

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #17 
From Ted's "Billy Boy"

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #18 
Here's one from Ted's "Girl with the Flaxen Hair" arrangement:

Notice the 3 in the name of the last chord.  This was his way of writing that the 3rd is in the bass.  
He didn't use this very often, and when he did it was usually under a slash, like:  Amaj9/3.
For a note in the soprano, he occasionally put it above a slash, like:  Amaj9\3 (third on top).

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #19 
From measure 18 of Ted's "Happy Days are Here Again" a nice little G# major chord move:

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hey guys,
A little feedback, please:  do you want this thread to continue?  Is it useful or just redundant?

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AsatBluesboy

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hey Paul

I like your idea and I check out the new chord move almost every day.

And it's a pretty cool idea to put some life back into this otherwise really silent forum.

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Christoph
barbaralovedcats

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Reply with quote  #22 
Paul,   In my humble opinion, this is one of the best threads ever.  When it comes to understanding certain "moves" in the context of a particular harmonic landscape, dealing with a measure, or a few measures, at a time can amount to a more digestible and thus more highly assimilable musical feast and learning experience for some folks as opposed to trying to learn an entire arrangement at once.   If i recall correctly then in fact Ted suggested such an approach in his book entitled Single Note Soloing, Volume 1, albeit in the context of single note lines.   Guitarist Howard Roberts wrote an article, "On Learning Music", where he also recommended such an approach.   


BLC 
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #23 
Thanks for the feedback.  Okay then, let's keep this going. (Other contributors are most welcome!)
Here is from Ted's 1976-06-09 comping page for "Moonglow."  It's actually a ii-V-I in G, but starts off with the b5 sub for the ii chord.
I love the descending line on the 3rd string (tenor voice).

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #24 
Okay, I'm cheating a bit here:  this one is from the soon-to-be-posted comping study for "Come Rain or Come Shine."  This excerpt is actually not part of the song, but it's a little extra tidbit at the end.  I think Ted was demonstrating how this one chord shape could be used for all three chords in the ii-V-i progression.  I had to re-draw the grids.  You'll understand why when you see the original page in June.
Check it out.

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #25 
A ii-V-I in G from Ted's "Autumn Leaves" Comping 1979-07-21.
If you choose the optional note it changes the Gmaj9 to G/9.

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #26 
From Ted's "Girl with the Flaxen Hair"
It's a bit long, but a nice sequence with melody.
....Does anyone want to suggest the chord names?

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goldglob

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulVachon
From Ted's "Girl with the Flaxen Hair"
It's a bit long, but a nice sequence with melody.
....Does anyone want to suggest the chord names?


Ah yes, beautiful piece of music...can't find my definitive classical guitar edition...another one I should have kissed goodbye when I 'lent' it to someone.
Anyway, bearing in mind that the melody is meant to sustain, a chordal analysis becomes more complicated than first sight suggests. Just looking at the shapes we have A6, G#m7, F#m7, Ema7, D#Ø, C#m7, Bm7...all key of E except the last one. But looking at the melody and suspensions, we have A, A6, Ama7, G#m7, Ama7, F#m7, A, Ema7, F#m7, D#Ø, F#m, C#m7, D, Bm7.
A beautiful example of scale tone chords blending (morphing).
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #28 
Goldglob,
Yes.  I agree with your first group of chords, but I hear the final one as D6 rather that Bm7....fine point, but that A,D on the bottom seems to say "D" more than Bm, unless it is played up an octave.  I think register is a big part in how a chord will sound.
And not shown is the E harmonic note on the 12th fret, 6th string that is to sustain throughout the phrase until the last chord.  That's what Ted intended the squiggly line underneath the chords is meant to represent.

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #29 
Excerpt from "And I Love Her"

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #30 
I like the sound of this move of E to E7 to A back to E with an ascending bass line (with a C7 snuck in there).
You might find it easier to finger the final E chord with the B on the 6th string instead of the 5th string....unless you intend to follow through to the next phrase.  In that case, the finger is perfect, albeit a bit "stretchy."
It's from "Happy Days Are Here Again"

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