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Ebard155

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #1 

So I have been recently excited by quartal harmony ala McCoy Tyner's comping vocabulary. I understand how to stack 4ths in different keys and key types (major scale derivatives, melodic minor, and harmonic minor), but I am wondering if Ted ever mapped out any method to using quartal substitutions with the goal of being able to read through a changes in a real book and play quartally as much as possible.

Thank you,

-Eric 

James

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Posts: 292
Reply with quote  #2 
I do not know the answer to your question about playing quartal harmony over real book tunes.


However, I specifically brought up the question of quartal harmony in at least one of my lessons with Ted.  He played a number of chord scales for me using quartal harmony and advocated that approach.  Practice fourth harmony chord scales.  Then he played A Kind of Blue with quartal harmony.  I'm embarrassed to say that I didn't recognize one of the most famous tunes in jazz during my lesson, being much more familiar with classical music than jazz.  Somewhere I have a cassette of this lesson and the recording may eventually make it to tedgreene.com.  But first, I'll have to find the cassette and second, I'll have to overcome my cringing at my ignorance and arrogance during the lesson.
James

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Posts: 292
Reply with quote  #3 
With respect to using quartal harmony in tunes, you can, of course, understand fourth based chords in terms of conventional tertian harmony.  If I have a chord with a fourth above the root and a fourth above that, then I have a chord with some kind of 11th (maybe sharped, maybe not) and some kind of 7th (maybe major, maybe minor).  So I could play a chord with a root, #11, and maj7 over a major type chord and it would be quartal harmony.  I could also play a chord with a major 3rd, a 6th, and a 9th, which would also be quartal harmony and conventionally be a 6/9 no root, no fifth chord.  So a straightforward approach to playing tunes is to understand the quartal harmony with conventional analysis.
PaulV

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Posts: 1,652
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Eric,
I'm sorry that I've been negligent in posting any of Ted's lesson pages about 4th chords.  I promise that in the next few months I get some of these pages up.  I'll take a look at what he has and try to present them in some kind of logical series. In the meantime here's a simple one Ted wrote on V7 - I Diatonic 4th Chords.
Hope this helps a little.

Attached Images
jpeg More_V7-I_in_Diatonic_4th_Chords,_1986-12-06.jpg (602.72 KB, 113 views)


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PaulV

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Posts: 1,652
Reply with quote  #5 
Here's another one on Diatonic 4th Chords (in a major key), R,4,7,9 Types, Middle Strings.
Enjoy!

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jpeg Diatonic_4th_Chords,_R479_Types,_Middle_Strings,_1987-04-21.jpg (569.19 KB, 97 views)


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