PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
AsatBluesboy

Registered:
Posts: 33
Reply with quote  #16 
Thank You James.

I once had a teacher giving me an easy explanation of chord-naming: 9=7+2, 11=7+4 and 13=7+6. That means every chord with a 9, 11 or 13 is supposed to have a flat seven and be either dominant or minor-seven. For (tonic)-major chords there are names like Cmaj9, Csus4 and C6 (among others).

This explanation, although theoretically not completely right, has helped a lot in reducing chords from real book charts to basic chords, especially in the beginner's stage. And it kind of sticked with me, so that I don't care if a 13th chord has a ninth in it or not.

So for example this is a  F13:
-
3
2
1
-
1

It has the flat seven and the sixth and so it is a F13

Having a chord with a #5 gives the notion that I could play a 13th but no 5th for "decoration" and vice versa with the b13th. That's why I would rather name it Dm7b13 instead of Dm7+.

Thanks again for the explanation.

Regards Christoph
James

Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #17 
Most people in the jazz world world call the chord you're showing, with the notes F Eb A D, "F13," but Ted called it "F7/6."  He would reserve the name "F13" for a chord with the notes F Eb A D G.

Bottom line is, we just want to communicate and play music together.  We don't need to be too fussy about names.  But since my responsibility was writing up an explanation of Ted's V-System, I felt a duty to try to be true to Ted's naming conventions.  I wasn't perfect about it at first and got some beneficial feedback from folks in this forum.

I think his chord naming was aimed at being specific and clear.   Other ways of naming chords can also be reasonable.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE