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Larsen

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Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #1 

Hello friends [smile]

In the Modern Chord Progressions book I'm at "Diatonic cycle of 4ths in major keys" part where Ted gives the I IV starting examples. I have trouble understanding a particular example with some altered notes (is this the right term?)

Is it right to say the first one is Dmaj7 +11, and the second Moves into a Gm7 b9 ? 

If so, what is the "rule" to build the next chords? Would it be C#m7 +11, F#m7 b9 and so on? (alternating following the two first examples). I tried this but it all sounds a bit alien to me. Not sure what else info to add in this post. Maybe someone can help me see the logic clearer.

PaulV

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Posts: 1,571
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Larsen,
You're on the right track. 
The diatonic cycle of 4ths would be: I - IV - vii - iii - vi - ii - V - I.
In this case:  Amaj7 - Dmaj7 - G#m7b5 - C#m7 - F#m7 - Bm7 - E7 - Amaj7.
Technically, the move from the IV chord to the vii chord is not a perfect 4th, but a #4.  But that is in necessary to keep everything diatonic.

Naming these chords you could forget about the moving notes (the X's) and just name them by the qualities as I listed above.

Any notes you add should be from the diatonic scale, and those notes can be: 
   9ths (on the I, ii, IV, V and vi chords),
   b9ths (on the iii and vii chords),  
   11 (on all except for the IV chord), 
   #11 (on the IV chord) ,
   b5 (for the vii chord).
   6 or 13 (on all except the iii and vi chords)
   b6 or b13 (on iii and vi chords)

Hope this helps.

__________________
--Paul
Larsen

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Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Paul. I see that following the diatonic notes helps me memorize keys very effectively. But that "X" interval on the G#m7 really threw me off. That unison plus a half step is so tense but I'm sure it has its uses.
LeonWhite

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Posts: 427
Reply with quote  #4 
Glad you got your answer.  Please remember, however, that the rules Paul has sited are only for the Diatonic MAJOR harmony, like your example.  All the alterations (like b9) have other uses in other tonalities.  (b9 is found on the V chord in harmonic minor, if I recall, for example).
Enjoy, and please ask other questions as needed.

Leon
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