PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 4 of 6      Prev   1   2   3   4   5   6   Next
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #46 
Thanks for your comments, James and Tim.  I'm going with Ab9#11.
__________________
--Paul
TLerch

Registered:
Posts: 239
Reply with quote  #47 
Funny James I thought I remember seeing that and looked thru MCP to see if I could find it and didnt so I let it go. I also agree that some of Teds early naming conventions were a little confusing and perhaps he eventually did too since he changed some of them as time went on.
James

Registered:
Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #48 
Tim, your looking through MCP gave me the idea to look through CC.  So we actually do help each other around here.
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #49 
Hi guys,
I'm working on one of Ted's unpublished arrangements and I wanted some help with fingering suggestions.  See the attached image file.
These chords are extracted out of context....they don't go together.  The red chord names are mine.

- I love that Dmaj9 chord, but how to get the F# on string 2 and keep the other strings ringing?  Maybe a thumb for the bottom two?
I normally finger this chord as 3,3,1,4,2,2 which may seem a bit odd but it's easy for me (and great for harp harmonics).

-  For the G/9/#11 does anyone else find it difficult to get the pinky to bend back sufficiently so the top string will ring for the X note?  To me this is a bit clumsy.  Did I name that chord correctly?

- And for the G/9 - is it possible to keep string 2 ringing for the X note? (Yes, that is a 15th fret marker.)

- The Bmaj7 is similar to the Dmaj9 except that the 9th is not played.  Same fingering?

Any comments/suggestions/help is appreciated.



I included that last unnamed Em7 chord there just for fun....pretty wild and wavy tie lines, Teddy! 


Attached Images
jpeg Chords_for_Fingering.jpg (219.37 KB, 24 views)


__________________
--Paul

James

Registered:
Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #50 
My first thoughts:

Dmaj9 with 2 double stopping and 3 barring three strings.  Move 4 for X.  Not all notes sustain.
             
        3
2 2 1 4 3 3

or

T T 1 3 2 2 with 2 double stopping the top two strings.  4 for X.  This way you get all notes sustaining.

----

G/9/#11 with 1 barring.

1 2 3 4 1

----

2 1 3 4 4

X with barred 3, 4 has to roll up.

See MCP page 28, first progression on line 3: E6 C#m7/11 F#m7 B7 Emaj7.  On the C#m7/11, Ted shows that he did this kind of thing with the third finger barred.  Or in the MCP example, with a rolling barre.

----
Bmaj7 same as Dmaj9 without barring or double stopping on high strings.

----

0 2 2 0 3 4 and 1 for X
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #51 
Okay folks, we have another installment of "Name That Chord."  (insert whoops and cheers.)

Currently I'm working on one of Ted's comping pages and he has a ii-V-I in the key of F.
On this page Ted wrote only the root letter of the chord, leaving the quality to be added by the student.
It's a Gm - C13 - F6/9, but the Gm is the problem.  It is spelled 5, b3, 11 (or 4).

It could be a Gm7/11 without the b7, but I'm wondering if Ted had a more specific name for this.
It's not listed in the chord formulas in Chord Chemistry.

What would Ted have called this baby?

Attached Images
jpeg Gm-C13-F69_Chords.jpg (40.63 KB, 10 views)


__________________
--Paul

James

Registered:
Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #52 
I suppose either Gm/11 or Gm(7)/11 would be consistent with Ted naming style.  In the 43 Four-Note Qualities chapter I named it the first way, without the (7).  That is also how Ted names it in his Personal Notes Chord Voicing Organization Worksheet dated as begun 4-18-80.  It's chord #29.  Of course, in the V-System, it has a root to make it a four note chord.  Here it has no root.
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #53 
Thanks.  I'm going with Gm/11.  That seems to fit Ted's chord-naming scheme the best.
You'll see this in an upcoming comping page on "A Foggy Day - high-register piano-voicings" from 1990.

__________________
--Paul
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #54 
Hi,
I'm working on one of Ted's lesson pages for next month.  It is for the V-System.  It involves ii7-V7-I progressions, mixing V-1 and V-2 chords.
The whole page is ii7-V7 and ii7-V7-I.  Okay that is set.
So now comes these chords:
ii-V-I in B (ex 3a).jpg 

And I'm seeing them as:
C#m/9/11 – F#13sus/b9 – B/9 

That F# chord is a beautiful sound in the progression, but would you name it differently?
Yes, one of its synonyms would be Em(maj7) - and I do hear it as a iv, but we're staying withing the parameters Ted established for this study as being ii-V-I progressions.
Your thoughts anyone?


__________________
--Paul
goldglob

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #55 
I agree with your analysis. I'd write it as F#13b9 (sus), but that's another topic.
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #56 
I just noticed on page 51 of Chord Chemistry that Ted has a few of these chords written as E11/13b9 or E11b9(13)
Is that a better way to write this? 

In other words:  C#m/9/11 – F#11/13b9 – B/9    or    C#m/9/11 – F#11b9(13) – B/9 

__________________
--Paul
James

Registered:
Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #57 
I would write:

C#m/9/11  F#13b9sus  B/9

As you clearly already noticed, the C#m/9/11 has no b7 in it, which is why we indicate that the 9 and 11 are "add."

On quick perusal, I notice the chords on page 51 of Chord Chemistry that are labelled 11b9(13) contain a 3.  Ted tends to name chords with a 4 but no 3 "sus," as on pages 43 and 44.

In the 43 Four Note Qualities (http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/v_system/14_The_43_Four-Note_Qualities.pdf), I named the first chord m/9/11 no R.  It's chord number 2 in the list of 43.  I named the second chord 13b9sus no R, 3.  It's chord number 11 in the list of 43.  The /9 chord is number 27 in the list of 43.

In that (admittedly scary) V-System explanation chapter, I indicated which chord tones are omitted.  But the usual Ted naming doesn't have that specificity.  So instead of "F#13b9sus no R, 3," we just say "F#13b9sus."
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #58 
Thanks James.
On p.51 of Chord Chemistry, Ted has some chords near the bottom of the page that are E11/13b9  (without the parentheses around the 13), and this might be a viable "Ted" naming convention.  
However, I agree that F#13b9sus is probably the most user-friendly name, and I'll use that.

__________________
--Paul
James

Registered:
Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #59 
Hi Paul,

You're right that the E11/13b9 chords on p.51 of CC don't have 3rds (G# notes) and yet are still called 11.  So I suppose that's an alternative in keeping with early Ted naming.  But yes, 13b9sus seems more straightforward and still consistent with Ted naming style.
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #60 
Here's another chord in search of a "proper" name.
This is extracted from Ted's 1990 "Misty" arrangement that we'll be posting in a couple of months.  
Misty, TedGreene Arr., 1990-12-25 EXCERPT.jpg
The chord over the lyric "you're" is an oddball.
Since it is sandwiched between the Cm and the Bbm, it would seem logical for it to be some kind of F7 or B7 chord. But it has an E-natural and some other conflicting notes.

Maybe the best way to name this would be to just think in terms of moving lines and not try to give it a name.  
Also, you might consider enharmonic equilavents for the Db (C#) and Gb (F#) as I've spelled it.
Nevertheless....anyone have any ideas? 


__________________
--Paul
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE