PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Ragabhava

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi there,

this is a wonderful forum celebrating the memory of an exceptional person. Lots of knowledgeable pple here too, so I thoguht I'll ask :-)

I seriously started working on Single Note Soloing vol 1 and would like to really get my triads (first things first) under the fingers. I am playing them in all inversions, open, closed all over the neck through Cycle progressions. Good work but pretty boring. I'm looking for simple etudes where most diatonic triads are used in to make this a bit more musical. Since I'm a fretless player I tend to favor single line stuff (maybe written for wind instruments or celli/violins). I can play all triad inversions of all types though as a non arpeggiated chord as long as it stays three notes only. I'm coming from rock so I'm not familiar with classical repertoire. I've tried a few Bach pieces but it gets to involved (chromatics, modulations etc.). Very beautiful but not really simple, to be euphemistic.

So, as the title says, I would be very thankful for some pointers to very simple triadic etudes/pieces which stay in one key and don't involve four part chords and which don't introduce tones foreign to the scale.

cheers and thanks for this superb and generous site!
PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,550
Reply with quote  #2 
Maybe this can help a little:
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/singlenote/PolyrhythmicDiatonicTriadsInTheMajorScale_1985-08-20.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/singlenote/MelodicPatternsRepeatedAtThe4th_TedGreene_1978-05-28.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/singlenote/Melodic_Patterns_KeyOfC_TedGreene_1974-02-19.pdf

These are for chords, but you can play as single-notes also:
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/chords/Diatonic_Chord_Scales-FormsForBuildingInMajorKeys_1976-05-05_1978-0818.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/chords/R-3-5_Triads_and_7-R-3_7th_Chords_In_Short_Melodic_Phrases_1985-07-05.pdf
http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/chords/Diatonic_Chord_Scales_-_Major_Key_1979-09-18.pdf

And Ted would probably have to play them forward, backward, and in cycles and skips....anything to make it interesting to play and listen to....and other keys.
Good luck!





__________________
--Paul
RobertS

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #3 

Ragabhava --> This recently posted file sounds like it might also fit what you are looking for...

http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/baroque/SomeWaysToMakeMusicWithTriadChordScales-TG_1974-09-26.pdf


Paul - thanks so much for delivering this one for us - still working through it, but so far its everything I was hoping to for !

cheers
Robert

PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,550
Reply with quote  #4 
Robert,
Glad Ted found a spot for you with this lesson.
BTW, am working (slowly) on the other lesson you requested....but it is an eye-squinter and I can only do so much at a time. Other lessons have higher priorities.

__________________
--Paul
Ragabhava

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks, Paul and Robert !

It isnt exactly what I was looking for but it is very helpful nonetheless. Practicing in sequences is of course the way to go (as I've experienced while working for years on my scales). I'll definitely explore these pdfs in detail ! I think Bergonzi makes a whole school of thought out of it.

Seeing that many pple here seem to be complete harmony nuts I was hoping for some references to classical composers/pedagogues/specific compositions. I am quite sure that there are quite a handful of pieces written for exploring diatonic triads - pieces of music as opposed to pure exercises, with voice leading and "nice" and cheesy melodies. I think I'll go and ask around on classical forums.
kontiki

Registered:
Posts: 250
Reply with quote  #6 
What i usually do when working on triads is try to harmonize simple tunes on the fly using only triads and keeping the melody in the top voice. I usually just take simple melodies like twinkle twinkle little star, home on the range, when the saints, glory halelujah etc. and sometimes i'll take a simple classical melody and do the same.
For instance i'll take something like Grieg's "Morning mood" or the main melody from the 2nd movement of Dvorak new world symphony and try to harmonize the melody on the fly using only triads, not worrying so much about voice leading or whar's in the bass, but keeping the melody on top and using the basic harmony. usually "almost" all the melody notes in these examples can have a 1 to 1 harmonization . You need to use your ear and your taste to decide which melody notes don't get a triad.

__________________
Dmolished = Egads
RobertS

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #7 
Ragabhava


in terms of putting 3 note triads into a "song format" and a less "boring" practice routine, I find Ted's blues studies are brilliant - there are so many of them on the TG site (in the Blues section), and many are based around use of 3 note triads, with wonderful voicings and voice leading in a 12 bar blues format...its not classical but maybe worth consideration. A couple in particular, are the "Gospel Influenced Blues" , and the "Gospel Blues" are almost entirely based on 3 note triads, provide so many ideas on use of such triads in a musical song context, and provide a foundation for some great personal improvisations and variations to your hearts content..There are also many Walking chord blues pieces based around 3 chord triads that have similar features.

In the "classical" vein, there is a great write up on the site (courtesy of Paul) on Ted's approach to Greensleeves with notation using simple chords and triads as well as more elaborate Jazz treatment.

http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/arrangements/Greensleeves-TedGreeneArrFromChordChemistry-NotesGrids.pdf

Otherwise, just before Ted's rendition of You'll Never Walk Alone in the CVG video (at 8:40 min mark), Ted introduces this tune as " a tune that uses a lot of triads but somehow (this) makes it sound really good"..there are a couple of study docs with show the basic chord outlines for this tune under Arrangements and Transcriptions which you can refer to if this tune / style matches your interest...I can imagine this tune can sound really cool on fretless bass with the right voicings...to each his own!

Anyhow hopefully this helps,

cheers
Robert



Ragabhava

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #8 
Kontiki

ha! now thats a coincidence: I was just combining triad arps into some progressions yesterday evening  and the beginning of Griegs Morning Mood came out! I couldn't stop playing it over and over :=)  Ok, it is pretty obvious, but theres a lot of beautiful arpeggiating melodies starting from that spot.

Thanks for sharing, I'll definitely start harmonizing some tunes.
Ragabhava

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #9 
Robert

of course my goal is to expand from triads into 7ths and all the extensions later on. I definitely want to learn jazz, thats why I work with Teds Book on single note soloing (very beautiful runs, I love it) and the extensions are introduced there obviously. And I love the blues, so much so that I've turned myself into a John Lee Hooker clone at some point in the past :=)

But I've understood that I skimped on the basics and have comitted myself to really internalizing all 12 keys in a diatonic way first. I want to be able to instantly answer questions like "what notes form the vi in F#" before playing triads over other bass notes etc. So simple children songs or "Romantic Piano For Candlelight Dinners" stuff is what I have in mind right now.

Oh, and btw, I'm a fretless guitar player, not a bassist :=)

Thank you for the pdf on Greensleeves, study this I must!
Ragabhava

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #10 
Whilst pondering on all your valuable input so far with my guitar in hands it occured to me that you all are basically saying - in a very constructive way - that instead of asking for some ready made compositions by some long dead person written for children I should make up my own [smile]. Yes, it took me a while to get that, shows that I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer. A lack of confidence nonwithstanding this is exactly what I am doing right now and its great fun and even better sounding than I expected. Thanks for taking the wooden beam out of my eye.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE