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Thomas_james

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello everyone! I was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to apply teds teachings to jam/improve music. ESP how to groove on one to two chord vamps for an extended period of time (More than twelve bars). Thank you all in advance!
DaveAnno

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Posts: 175
Reply with quote  #2 
This might be of help: http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/singlenote/SingleNotePlaying_1976-02-27and28_parts1-4.pdf
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Dave
James

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Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #3 
Thomas_James,

Can you please clarify your question?  When you say, "improve" do you mean improvise?  "Improve" is sometimes used to mean substitution and harmonic enhancement.  If you mean "improvise," are you talking about playing a single note solo over a one or two chord vamp?  Or are you asking about how to improvise with chords for a one or two chord vamp?
Thomas_james

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Reply with quote  #4 
Dave & James, thank you both for your time & replays.

James, I'm a deadhed. I'm not sure if you have ever listened to that type of music but it is much like jazz. There may be a section of the "jam" where D (for instance, could be any key) is played for 24 plus bars. I'm trying to find some of teds materials to learn how to play this via chords. How do I keep the jam interesting, while adding color, yet just playing "D". I guess I'm asking how to vamp chords, without getting board playing the same chord for an extended period of time. Not sure if I clarified or complicated things lol
DaveAnno

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Posts: 175
Reply with quote  #5 
Hm... maybe stuff like this:

http://tedgreene.com/images/lessons/chords/DiatonicTriadsSoundsAndPedals_MajorKey_1976.pdf

(Looks like they made an error in the grids with parenthesis on the first line, the 8 should be 9 on both of those)

For example, first five chords all have an A in the soprano, but you also could play the open A string for a low drone instead.

I just did a quick look for something for ya, I'm sure there is much more in the lessons. (The V SYSTEM probably would keep you busy for a while) Have fun [wink]

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Dave
PaulV

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Posts: 1,569
Reply with quote  #6 
Hey Thomas,
Here's some suggestions for making a one-chord jam more interesting - both for you as the player and for the listeners:

If the chord is a D, then try all the D chords you know, root position and inversions - all string sets, low and high range.  Experiment with them and listen to what they sound like, what kind of "color" do they have, how does the low-range chords affect the overall ensemble sound?  How does the high-range chords sound?  

Now try adding some D6 chords.  Same thing: all forms, all inversions, all ranges.  Try mixing them in with the regular D chords.  Listen to this new "flavor" you're introducing into the harmonic mix.  Does it fit?  Are some inversion more "friendly" to play than others?  Be careful about some bass notes, like the 6th in the bass, which may tend to make things sound more "B minor-ish" than D.

Next add Dadd9 chords, or as Ted wrote it, D/9.  This is a triad with the 9th note added.  This can spice things up a bit.  Try mixing this in with all the other chords you've been playing up to now.

Now try throwing in some sus chords - meaning, take the D triad and substitute the 3rd with a 4th (up a 1/2 step).  This is another nice flavor.  See how you like this.  You'll probably not want to stay on this sound too long, but alternate it with another D sound.

Now try D6/9 chords.  Another nice color.

Then you can experiment with Dmaj7 and Dmaj9 chords. Be careful here, for that 7 can make it sound "too pretty" or jazzy and may not fit in the context of the jam.

This is a good place to start.  After you're comfortable with using these new colors on your chord palate, then you might want to dive into doing some small chord moves, like diatonic chord scales.

Good luck, and have fun with this.



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James

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Posts: 278
Reply with quote  #7 
Thomas_James,

You really want to to learn a bunch of V-2 and maybe V-4 chords.  These are great for vamping.

Head over to:

http://www.tedgreene.com/teaching/v_system_V2.asp

get some pages (Don't worry about doing them in order.  Just find a page or two that interests you.),

and have fun!
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