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rogertaylor

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Reply with quote  #1 
In addition to the "Approach Chord Blues" sheets, Ted also gave me this very cool sheet called "Jumpback Blues." A.K.A. Sandwich V Blues" or "Insert V Blues." That is, the V of the chord you are on is sandwiched in between two different versions of the chord you're on. Ted's instructions were to slide into the "V of" chord (the meat in the sandwich) from a 1/2 step below. This sheet is definitely worth the effort.

http://www.tedgreene.com/images/lessons/jazz/TedGreene_JumpBackBluesStudy_1988-04-19.pdf

Cheers,

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Roger Taylor
ChemicalChords

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Reply with quote  #2 

Thanks Roger!


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Sam
steveknight

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you, Roger!
Alan

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Reply with quote  #4 

Thank you..   A great addition to the library...


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"Jazz isn't dead, It just smells funny"
earsoup

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Posts: 79
Reply with quote  #5 
sweetness !
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hey guys, I wrote up a compilation page for this blues study.  I hope you find it helpful.

Jumpback Blues

Ted Greene Blues Study – April 19, 1988

     This blues study illustrates the “V-of” principle:  any chord may be preceded by it’s V7.  I believe that Ted used the term “jumpback” here to mean that for a given chord, you would first play that chord, then “jump back” to it’s V7, then return to the original chord.  
     Ted wrote at the top of his original page, “ ‘Jumpback Blues’ (I may also refer to it as ‘Sandwich V Blues’ or ‘Insert V Blues&rsquo”.  These are just different ways to express the same principle — to show how the given chord is played with its V7 chord inserted.  Think of this as a single harmonic unit:  I7 – V7 – I7.  It’s just the I7 chord with its V “sandwiched” in between itself.  This adds some harmonic interest and flavor to an otherwise somewhat stagnant harmony.
     On his original sheet Ted provided only the letter name of the chord, and wrote a comment that the student was to “add the exact chord qualities.”  On my compilation page I added these chord qualities in red.
     Attached is an analysis of the basic blues progression Ted used for this study.  He added some extra chord “flavors” in some spots, but this is the basic harmonic structure.  If you compare this progression to the attached “Jumpback Blues, notation & grids” page, you’ll see that for the first 6 measures Ted applied this “sandwich” or “jumpback” technique to each chord, adding its V7 chord.
http://www.tedgreene.com/fromstudents/JumpbackBlues.asp 
     Measures 7-10 utilizes the common ascending scale-wise progression of I-ii-iii to add that “pretty major 7 sound” to the blues.  (The first time I heard this variation in the blues was on “Stormy Monday Blues” by the Allman Brothers Band, Live at the Fillmore East.  It's in the key of G.  Check it out.)  For measure 7 instead of using the Bm7 chord (the ii chord), Ted played some E11 chords, which in essence have the same sound and function as the Bm7.
     Measures 11-12 is of course the turnaround.  In Ted’s Chord Chemistry book (p.99) he lists 25 of the “nearly infinite number of turnarounds.”  Here he used #18 with some slight adjustments.  If you find that the Bm9 – E7(#5#9) in bar 12 poses too much of a stretch for you, then find an easier voicing to grab with the same sound.
     Ted also wrote on his original page at the beginning of measure 8: “Please add some open ghost tones on some of the ‘ands’ (in between beats) on this line to help push it along.” And at the bottom he wrote:  
   1)  MEMORIZE SLOWLY, phrase by phrase
   2)  The necessary ‘hip” jazz-blues feel is paramount.
   3)  Transpose to the keys of Ab, G, F# (or Gb) and Bb.

Enjoy!
--Paul


Here are three links to YouTube of Ted and Brian Totten in a private lesson on the blues.  In segment # 7, 8, and 9 they review "Jumpback Blues" - but in the key of F# instead.



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--Paul
GregB

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Posts: 118
Reply with quote  #7 
I'm not complaining, this is just an FYI.

In the grand staff notation (the 2nd image in the link above) the chord position of the Bb7 in the 2nd line is marked as being at the 3rd fret. It's actually at the 13th fret.

For me, I'm getting a lot more out of the staff notation becasue it gives me the proper timing.  But once I heard it in the blues lesson video it really started to come together.  This is a cool song.

Does anyone else have problems with their fingers clashing on that 3rd chord? 
x 10 11 11 10 x
I'm trying to learn to do Ted's 2 note, one finger trick where I play both the 11th fret notes with one finger.  That may be the solution because fingering the chord 1 3 4 2 is really cramped and the B string gets muted.

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Greg,
The file that you mentioned has been corrected. (go ahead and re-load the image.)
It now has fret 13 instead of 3.
That was a mistake I made while copying and moving the image.
I appreciate to know about these typos so I can fix them.

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--Paul
GregB

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Posts: 118
Reply with quote  #9 
Wow, that was fast. Thank you

You know, I've been playing guitar for 35 years.  I bought Ted's books in the 70's but it's taken this long to get over being intimidated by the overwhelming amount of information (and work associated with it) in those books.  This site is a wonderful resource and it's really helping me move my playing to a new level.
TLerch

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Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Paul and everyone,
I was sorting thru my various and scattered Ted sheets pertaining to Blues and made a discovery about the Jump Back Blues sheet(s). There are actually (at least) 2 separate sheets with Jumpback in the title.  One is in A as you have posted but the other is in F# and its called "Walking Bass Jump Back Blues" and that is the one that Ted has Brian play and then discusses.  I have the F# sheet and I think I got it here, do you remember if it is in the archives? if not I can try to post it. since it would be nice to have both sheet together.
take care, 
Tim
barbarafranklin

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Posts: 940
Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Tim,  
We have not posted it, but will be posting it in June - Paul has a compilation page made up for it already!  So Tim, don't post it yet.  This is great - a wonderfully coordinated effort.  Thank you so much!  B.

For everyone:  There will be other surprises for June as well!

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Barbara Franklin
TLerch

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Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #12 
OK Barbara,
 I was just very happy to find the sheet since there seemed to be a bit of confusion. So soon it will all be very clear!
Paul  is pretty amazing! I was just going through all that he has done and it's a remarkable achievement, the compilation sheets are a very important contribution!.
Tim

wkriski

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Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #13 
I think the archived and new videos are a great way to bring this stuff to life even more than the sheets themselves, like what Tim Lerch did recently. I hope to do some one day as well Can Paul V. and others also record some videos of their playing these lesson sheets? I think that would be awesome.
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Will Kriski http://www.willkriski.com
Zorshelter

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Posts: 86
Reply with quote  #14 
Oh yeah it would be awesome to see/hear these sheets come to life

@Barbara: I like surprises ;-)

BenjaminIra

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Reply with quote  #15 
Does anyone know where the Original F# walking bass jump back blues is? Brian Totten plays it for Ted in video Part 7... Love the Bass Line!
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