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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #31 
Shall we proceed to examples #11 and 12? 
Remember that Ted's note from example #9 stated,
"Expanded diatonic[ism] for the next 4 examples"--which will include these two.

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Diatonic_Major_Scale_Melodies,_EX_11-12.jpg (137.05 KB, 45 views)


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spideyguy

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Reply with quote  #32 

I was curious about number 9 and why does the bVII work so well here? I thought that was what the chord progression was, but thought that could not be right and I sat there and puzzled over it for awhile.

Keith

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Reply with quote  #33 
I guess the short answer is because we're used to hearing it.
Long form:
It opens up the subject that Ted called "expanded diatonic harmony'.
In addition to the chords built from the major scale, there are other chords that are built from other scales that sound nice.
A place to start is by looking at the chords in the key with 1 additional flat.
If we're in C look at the key of F. F has a Bb chord in it. So you'ld borrow the Bb chord to expand the key of C.
Another common one is Borrowing from C natural minor. That gives you Ab, Bb, C. Change the Cm to Cmajor. I started by finding different pathways to the 1 chord. I think of it as borrowing the cadences from other tonalities or modes if you will. The term I heard is 'Borrowing from minor'.
I'm having a hard time typing this on my phone and keeping track of what I'm saying, so please forgive me' if these thoughts a a bit disjointed.
Hope it helps.
My best to you.
Keith
spideyguy

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Reply with quote  #34 
Thanks Keith for the explanation. That makes total sense!
Keith

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Reply with quote  #35 
On the subject of "borrowing from minor".
The phrygian cadance is cool too. Fm, Eb, Db, C.

I have this image in my head. ( probably put there by Ted)

If the tonic is the center, then there are belts of harmony circled around it. The 1st belt that comes to mind is the fundamental harmony of the major scale.

Then then a little farther out is changing the 3 minor7 chords into Dom7 types.
1Maj, 3m7, 6m7, 2m7, 5Dom7, 1Maj7.

Becomes;

 1Maj, 3Dom7, 6Dom7, 2Dom7, 5Dom7, 1Maj7.

Then there's the 4 chord. Things to do to get 4 chord to move back to 1.

I know of 2 main pathways here. (Depending on if the melody is the 3rd of the chord or not)
.
(1st)
4Maj, 4Dom7, 1Maj.  (Bluesey)

4Maj7, 4min7, 1Maj7.

4Maj7, 4min6, 1Maj7.

4min6 = b7Dom(9), 1Maj7 (This is another way to answer your original question about wht the b7 chord works so well.)

(2nd)

  4, #4dim7 (AKA 1dim7), to 1. (Bluesey, Gospel sound)

Each note in the  diminshed chord is b9 of a Dom7 chord. So,
F#dim7= F7(b9)=Ab7(b9)=Bb7(b9)=D7(b9). Each of these chords are a b3 apart, just like the notes of the dim7th chord..

So 4, (insert any of these 4 Dom7 chords), 1, can work nice, depending on the voiceleading.

ex. Key of C;

F, F#dim7, C

F, F7, C
F, Ab7, C
F, B7, C
F, D7, C


So things can start off being close to the origianal key and then get further away and still sound nice.  

To sum up for now; there's diatonic harmony and then there are a number of stock, old familiar "friends" that come to visit from other keys. They have been around for a while and are happilly accepted by most ears. 

That's a start.

I haven't thought this all the way thru.
Most if not all of it is in Chord Chemistry.
If anyone remembers Ted's thoughts on this or has any input I would love to hear it.

ATB
Keith


PaulV

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Reply with quote  #36 
Great stuff, Keith!  If that was just a start I hope you continue.
Thanks.

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #37 
Anyone care to take a stab at examples #11 and 12?

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kontiki

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Reply with quote  #38 
11 & 12 are almost identical in that that they are both SWB  (scalewise bass) and that they both have the harmonic movement of   I   IV   bVII  bVI. Incidentally the first fret marker for #12 must be wrong, Otherwise the melody wouldn't be the same. It should be the same as #11.  

#11  Fadd9/C    Bbmaj9/D     Ebadd9   Dbmaj7(9)

#12  Fadd9/C    Bbmaj7/D     Eb6/9   Dbmaj7     note the nice ascending voice-leading in the three lowest voices.

I regard the bVI (Dbmaj7) as a deceptive cadence. It was a common device in the "common practice" period to go to a VI or bVI (especially in minor or through "mixture") as a deceptive cadence.

incidentally, in case some people are not aware of them: Ted speaks a little about expanded tonality and Expanded Diatonicism in these lessons:

Intro To Expanded Diatonicism

and 

Multi-Tonal Major Key Colors

he includes more than just a bVII in his definition of expanded Diatonicism. He seems to have had a modern take on the traditional  "mixture"  and "double mixture" ideas.

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #39 
Great stuff, Mike! 
I overlooked the fret marker typo...a rarity for Ted.
I'll have to look at the "Intro to Expanded Diatonicism" again.
Attached is examples #13 and #14 -- the final installment for Ted's page on "Warm Harmonization of Diatonic Major Scale Melodies."

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Diatonic_Major_Scale_Melodies,_EX_13-14.jpg (183.72 KB, 25 views)


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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #40 
Since no one commented on examples #13 and 14 I'll post my thoughts:

Example #13
key of F
Am7----Gm9----Bb/9----F/9
iii---ii---IV---I

Ted's note:
"Close harmony diatonic flowing into the warm primary colors of
IV I (through the avoidance of certain tones in the bass)
."


Example #14
key of C
C/9----Fmaj7----G11----Am9
I---IV---V---vi

Ted's note:
"I for iii7, ascending to the "darker" warmth of vi."

This now concludes the page on "Warm Harmonization of Diatonic Major Scale Studies."  (which you can find in the "Harmony & Theory" section of this website.)
Now we'll move on to the next page entitled, "Warm Harmonization of Melodies with b7 (Starting from I) / Approach Chord Studies."

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PaulV

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Reply with quote  #41 
Next Harmonization Study from Ted -- this one is called, "Warm Harmonization of Melodies with b7 (Starting from I) / Approach Chord Studies."
Here is the given melody in the key of F:

Examples #1 and #2:
Please provide chord names, analysis, and any thoughts, observations or comments you'd like to share.
Thanks for your participation.

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_1-2.jpg (209.88 KB, 15 views)


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sonnyintervals

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Reply with quote  #42 
Ex #1
Fmaj7 -- Am7 -- Bbmaj7 -- C7#9 
   I      --   iii   --    IV      --   V

Ex #2
Fmaj7 -- Dm7 -- G7 -- C7#9
   I      --   vi    --  II  --  V


PaulV

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Reply with quote  #43 
Great.  Thanks, Steve.  OK, here's #3 and 4:

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_3-4.jpg (245.14 KB, 11 views)


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sonnyintervals

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Reply with quote  #44 
Ex #3 
Fmaj7 -- G sus4(or add 11?) -- Amin11 -- Bb11
   I      --    ii     --   iii    --  IV

Ex #4
Fmaj7 -- Bbsus2(or add9?) -- Ebmaj7 -- Dbadd 9
   I      --   IV   --    bVII   --    bVI

I suppose I should really say add as opposed to sus as the notes in question are not held over from the previous chord, is this correct?

Steve.
PaulV

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Reply with quote  #45 
Hi Steve,
Probably the add9 is more correct if there's a 3rd present, but if we just have 1,2 (9), and 5 what is the proper name?  Anyone else want to chime in?

For example #4 I wonder if the third chord (the one you've marked as Ebmaj7) could also be considered Cm9?  Especially since Ted included the optional C bass note.
If so, then the progression would be an ascending Bb/9 to Cm9 to Db/9.  That gives the progression some logic.  What do you think?
I like how Ted added the green hearts, indicating some of his favorites on this page.
Okay....on to examples #5 and 6.

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jpeg Warm_Harmonization_of_Melodies_with_b7,_1980-10-01,_Ex_5-6.jpg (254.53 KB, 11 views)


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