PLEASE REGISTER TO POST. Also, be sure to visit the main website www.tedgreene.com

**************************************************************************************
Buy NOW on Amazon
My Life with The Chord Chemist
A Memoir of Ted Greene, Apotheosis of Solo Guitar
Available at amazon.com

*Check it out!!!

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
Your contributions keep the site healthy and growing


More information HERE

Official Ted Greene Archives Blog

Ted Greene Archives on YouTube

Join Ted on FACEBOOK

NEW! Follow on TWITTER

..:: The Ted Greene Forums ::..
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 3      1   2   3   Next
JohnGibbs

Registered:
Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #1 
I remember reading that George showed Ted "Scott's Lullaby" I am a huge fan of George's original tunes and wondered if anyone has a copy of this or any other of George's work. I have the 9 solos that were published and the stuff from Just Jazz Guitar magazine. Any help would be appreciated. I also love the tune "Lap Piano." These two are probably my favorites. Thank You.
John

Registered:
Posts: 51
Reply with quote  #2 
I sent John Gibbs this reply and then decided some other folks might like to learn a bar or two of "Lap Piano". 

I had several lessons with George Van Eps circa 1991 and he showed me the basic shapes for playing "Lap Piano."

I had heard it on a live recording and loved it (of course). As I recall off the top of my head:

the first chord is Gm7:
G 6th string 3rd fret
F 4th string 3rd fret
Bb 3rd string 3rd fret

This chord is played for one beat (one of the things which makes the tune and this style so appealing is the one chord per beat feel) then we travel up for the 2nd beat to another little Gm:
Bb on the 4th string 8th fret
D on the 3rd string 7th fret
G on the 2nd string 8th fret

The next 2 chords are Am types played just the same as the preceding 2 but simply moved up 2 frets

his hand is moving back and forth like that throughout the tune... I suppose one could just play the voicings across the board and stay in one general area of the neck but I don't think it would have quite the same effect...

I'm at my job at the moment and without a guitar in hand can't recall any bits past this first bar...

(the next 2 chords might be Bb7:
Bb 6th string 6th fret
Ab 4th string 6th fret
D 3rd string 7th fret
then jumping to the small neighbor dominant chord on the 4th, 3rd & 2nd strings as before)

I thought I'd post just this small amount so that you might get the feel of that motion back and forth along the fingerboard...

George was delightful to spend time with and was even willing to spend time on the phone answering questions, etc.

Best to you all from John in Maine
JohnGibbs

Registered:
Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks. This may inspire me to sit down and write the whole song out. I'll check back in a month......Just kidding. Transcribing is good, and I don't have too much trouble with solos, but this stuff takes a huge attention span. I only get a few bars down before I get a headache. I am going to dedicate 30 minutes a day to transcribing this monster until I get it. I am still a little slow with transcribing from CD. I prefer tape so that I can use the cue/review button. With CD's the buttons are too sensitive for me. Thanks again. John Gibbs
DanSawyer

Registered:
Posts: 283
Reply with quote  #4 
quote: "This may inspire me to sit down and write the whole song out." I sure hope so.

__________________
Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
tedstafford

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #5 
I don't know Van Eps' playing very well. I've been working through the first inversion in Harmonic Mechanisms... and listening to "Hand-Crafted Swing," which has "Lap Piano" on it. What Van Eps recording(s) should I check out next? I'm curious about both his chordal and single-note textures.

thanks,
ted

__________________
music is the best
JohnGibbs

Registered:
Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #6 
I would check out the three albums re-released on CD: Mellow Guitar, My Guitar, and Soliloquy. I love everything he has done, so maybe someone else can narrow it down. The albums that he did on Concord are all good too. As for Dan Sawyer, I'm not sure what you meant by your last post, but I am going through a divorce and have been in a custody battle over my kids. Actually, this site has inspired me to pick up the guitar again after being down in the dumps for three months. I am hooked on the guitar as much as anyone, but was unable to play. So, transcribing Van Eps will give me something to look forward to. It might take me a while, but it will be worth it.
omobob

Registered:
Posts: 112
Reply with quote  #7 
My favorite is

http://www.amazon.com/George-Van-Eddie-Miller-Stanley/dp/6308039675/ref=sr_1_16?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201017064&sr=8-16

which is currently not available through amazon but I've seen it on ebay...

bishopdm

Registered:
Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #8 
Another good one is "Legends", which is half Johnny Smith (plectrum-style) and half George Van Eps (finger-style):

http://www.amazon.com/Legends-Guitar-Performances-Johnny-Smith/dp/B0000006NE/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1201025336&sr=1-8


__________________
David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
DanSawyer

Registered:
Posts: 283
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGibbs
As for Dan Sawyer, I'm not sure what you meant by your last post…
Oh, I just meant it would be cool to have a transcription of that and a lot of players would like to see it.

__________________
Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
tedstafford

Registered:
Posts: 38
Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks for the recommendations. I've got a lot of listening to do.

ted


__________________
music is the best
John

Registered:
Posts: 51
Reply with quote  #11 

I have a quick suggestion for folks that would like to hear George Van Eps
(playing with a pick) making great music.

these 4 tunes are a great place to start:

Kay's Fantasy
I Wrote it for Jo
Once in Awhile
Tea for Two

all recorded in (I think) 1949

the creativity, rhythmic drive, and musicality
are all off the charts. Fantastic moving harmonies

and rapid articulation.

I asked George about this session once and he told me that
he had written out a chord chart for the bass player
(due to the many unexpected modulations)
and then improvised within that structure.
 
in the past these recordings have been available
on the Jump label as:
George Van Eps/Eddie Miller/Stanley Wrightsman Trio

there are used copies on Amazon starting at $12... 
 
It's hard to go wrong with any Van Eps recording...

*Mellow Guitar: (he wrote the arrangements as well as the guitar parts
and practiced his parts for months on end before going into the studio)
*My Guitar:
(Capitol wanted him to record several Beatles tunes which he didn't care for...
as a result he reharmonized them made a few of them practically unrecognizable!)
*Soliloquy: What a beautiful recording!
 
Hope this inspires someone on the forum to check out
this wonderful music from a kind and creative man!
Listen & Enjoy!
Best to you all from John in Maine



jerome

Registered:
Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #12 
Hello Folks,

Here's a link to a site with a downloadable transcription of "Tangerine" from the LEGENDS CD.

http://blog.nocertainthing.co.uk/

Two more great examples of GVE's early plectrum technique can be found on the Yazoo CD Pioneers of Jazz Guitar. Two Van Eps originals, "The Chant" and an untitled guitar/bass duet with Bob Haggart incorrectly attributed to Dick McDonough & Artie Bernstein, can be heard as "Chasin' A Buck" and "The Dick Bernstein Ramble". 

Regards,
jerome
JeffStocksMusic

Registered:
Posts: 209
Reply with quote  #13 

Thanks for digging that out Jerome.  You don't see a lot of GVE transcriptions so this is a welcome addition.

DanSawyer

Registered:
Posts: 283
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerome
Two more great examples of GVE's early plectrum technique can be found on the Yazoo CD Pioneers of Jazz Guitar. Two Van Eps originals, "The Chant" and an untitled guitar/bass duet with Bob Haggart incorrectly attributed to Dick McDonough & Artie Bernstein, can be heard as "Chasin' A Buck" and "The Dick Bernstein Ramble"
I haven't heard those in a long time. Wasn't George still playing 6-string on those recordings?

__________________
Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
jerome

Registered:
Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #15 
George Van Eps switched to seven strings in 1938. These sides date to circa 1933-34 when he was still playing six strings.

He played some great stuff with Jess Stacy in 1951 that was just released on CD as "Jess Stacy 1951-1956" (Van Eps' solo on Indiana is worth the price of the CD) and also great solos with Marvin Ashe on an album called "New Orleans After Midinght" that was available from Bill Edwards website.

Regards,
jerome
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE :: DONATE