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DanSawyer

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by andybrown
WVXU radio in Cincinnati just put together a wonderful two hour tribute to jazz guitar legend Kenny Poole.


Thanks Andy!

Check this radio show out everyone. Kenny plays great and there are some wonderful anecdotes from friends and musicians who knew him well.


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Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
david

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Reply with quote  #32 

As a new member, I've really enjoyed  reading through these forums. As regards the wonderful solo guitarists listed, it's hard to think of additions, but early Tal Farlow could be pretty amazing. Also (and this may be  a little controversial) how about Eric Gale. I know his technique was hardly conventional , but I once heard him play Body and Soul (solo) with that unique fat bluesy sound of his, and it was stunning.

PaulV

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Reply with quote  #33 
Thought you all might be interested in this guitarist I stumbled upon on YouTube.  His name is Genil Castro, from Brazil.  Here are a couple of his clips, 2 solo, and 2 in ensemble.  Do a search on YouTube and you'll find more.  Beautiful tone, smooth technique.  Probably influenced by Ted and Lenny Breau.








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--Paul
bishopdm

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Posts: 244
Reply with quote  #34 
Wow...he's incredible! Thanks for putting the word out about him.


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David Bishop
Tucson, AZ
Masemm

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Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #35 
While you are on YouTube also check out this guy!
http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=brupaqui

His name is Bruno Marrazzo and has posted several tunes


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M Semmler
david

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Reply with quote  #36 

Yes Genil Castro is great--and while we're talking about Brazilian greats, Toninho Horta, Swami Jr, Chico Pinheiro (who has a cd coming out soon with Anthony Wilson) and Lula Galvao (who works a lot with the songer/guitarist Rosa Passos) are all marvellous players

jerome

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Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #37 
Hello Folks,
Discovered some wonderful YouTube clips of Jimmy Wyble. I thought they might be of interest. It's great that he's out playing again.
jerome


PaulV

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Reply with quote  #38 
Thanks Jerome!  Wow, I didn't even realize that Jimmy Wyble was still around. When I attended GIT in '78, he held some "round-robin" classes for groups of 5 or 6 at a time.  He was so humble and gentle - a quiet genius.  His approach is so unique.  I used to have his record and book on Etudes, and I worked up a couple of the pieces, but it was a real different mind-set to think that way.
--Paul

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chanesemusic

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Reply with quote  #39 
Jimmy Wyble has a website:    http://www.jimmywyble.com
DanSawyer

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Posts: 283
Reply with quote  #40 
Genil Castro is a new name to me, but won't be soon forgotten. What a great player. It's amazing on Funny Valentine… most of the time he doesn't even look at the neck when he's playing harmonics 12 frets above his left hand! He seems to know where they are by heart.

Tonhio Horta is another one who played amazing solo guitar sambas on a nylon string.


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Dan Sawyer, friend of Ted's.
geosochi

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Reply with quote  #41 
It's great to see that Genil de Castro has been mentioned and people get to check out his playing! He's a wonderful person and a brilliant player, everybody who appreciates solo jazz guitar should know about him.

I got into both Ted and Genil through Lenny Breau, and they were and are all in great admiration of each other. (I have no doubt Lenny would be a big fan of Genil's if he could hear him)

In addition to all the wonderful players already mentioned, I'd like to also bring up the Brazilian acoustic guitarist Luiz Bonfa. I don't know how much you guys are familiar with his playing, but aside from bossa-nova, he was also a world-class solo jazz guitarist!

The legendary rock session guitarist Carl Verheyen is also an excellent solo jazz player, he has an album full of jazz standards with his arrangement and performance.

I noticed Kenny Poole has already been mentioned.... I haven't had a chance to explore his playing more but from the little I've heard he's another one of those quiet geniuses.... this is some lovely playing....

Another genius guitarist who, just like Kenny, has preferred to stay in Cincinatti and thus has remained unknown, is Scotty Anderson.... what can I say, this man is beyond description, absolutely one of the most brilliant players who ever lived (and a sincerely kind-hearted individual)... a few youtube clips of him and Bob Saxton:



+others you will find there too

Has Ron Eschete been mentioned yet? And Johnny Smith? I like his album with George Van Eps very much. And another Van Eps collaborator, Howard Alden, one of the contemporary greats up there with Martin Taylor! I don't believe Ed Bickert or Jim Hall have ever made solo records, but, man, would it have been a treat!

Finally, I would like to mention the very unknown and underappreciated guitarist from New York, Alan de Mause. He had studied with the likes of Van Eps, Jim Hall, Jimmy Raney, classical guitar.... was very highly regarded by Ted, and by George Van Eps and Jimmy Wyble and many others. Really one of the best solo jazz players who incorporated classical technique into their playing. Sadly, he's saddled with Alzheimer's disease now and isn't able to perform or teach anymore, but he had been one of the pillars of the solo jazz guitar community around New York for the past several decades. Do check him out if you can.

So many names have been mentioned in this thread, I'll come again again and reread to digest it all, but, it feels so good to be among people who love solo jazz guitar so much too.


PS: a couple more things I have to share....


(not a solo jazz guitarist per se, though I'm sure he can and does play solo brilliantly.... but Sasha Starostenko is one of the geniuses of the instrument and a musical master too, it's just a shame his fame is confined to Russia and he has never made an official recording release much less ever been with a label..... the injustices of the world...)


(a very young Lenny, I think he's only about 20 here...he's playing with bass and drums, but his total approach is so harmonically complete... it's solo jazz guitar at its very best man!)


(a brief but very tasty clip of Joe Pass I uploaded... enjoy!)

LindseyBlair

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Reply with quote  #42 
Ted is tops, also Lenny Breau, George Van Epps, Tal Farlow, Joe Pass, Steve Masakowski, Steve Herberman, Bill Frisell has really changed the whole ball game with cool ideas. That Pat Metheny One Quiet Night album is great. Marco Pereira is great. Got a CD by a fingerstyle acoustic monster named Any Mckee that I love, and one by a guy that is an LA studio player/ songwriter named Mark Goldenberg that is really nice. Most of the young lions out of New York have put out a tune here or there & do a great job, guys like Kurt Rosenwinkle, Johnathon Kriesberg, Adam Rogers.
This site is AWSOME! The amazing thing about Ted Greene is he made this huge impact all over the world with some books and as far as I know just one record. All the while just teaching and playing, lets face it, not that many gigs. I've been playing over 40 years and I'm still learning a ton of stuff from Ted, and he is not even alive to show it to me.WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!
d0nba3r

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Posts: 33
Reply with quote  #43 
I've been reading this forum for some time, but I just registered. I have to say, in my opinion, the two solo players who were head and shoulders above the rest were Ted and Lenny Breau. These two gentlemen simply changed the game for everyone else. While their styles were different, they were both absolute masters. I was fortunate enough to know Danny Gatton for some time, and he spoke of Lenny Breau reverently, and showed me some great chords from Lenny. I also had the good fortune to take a few lessons from Ted. What a revelation!! There two guys were the best. There are many great players, but for solo guitar, they are the kings.
BrianB

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Reply with quote  #44 
Ted Greene is a hero to any one who has heard him play or read his books. Another top favorite is George Van Eps, who also wrote a number of amazing books. Lenny Breau has been a constant favorite of mine, and Ted's harmonics show how much Lenny Breau changed the guitar. I'm very partial to Joe Beck, who recently passed. He's done fantastic duos with Jimmy Bruno, and John Abercrombie, but his chord melody playing is incredible. He also invented the Alto guitar, which is a unique instrument all it's own. But I think why we are all here is who matters most to us, and that's hearing Ted play. I just discovered Ted not to long ago, and I can remember sitting down listening to Solo Guitar several times over in the dark in my apartment. He changed the entire way I look at music, and I know for a fact he's had a similar effect on all of us. Wes is very influential, and not many players take him serious enough. I know Ted wrote quite a bit about Wes, and although Wes maybe well known now, there is still much to be learned from him. And always, Ted, Ted, Ted. Solo Guitar changes everytime I hear it, it continues to get better and better. Check out Van Eps, Soliliquoy if you haven't. Amazing record.
LeonWhite

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Reply with quote  #45 
It may be worth considering whether ted belongs in the solo jazz category, as his playing is so much broader then just the idiom of standards. To me that's one of the gifts - Ted brings Bach to the solo guitar idiom, and the film composers and all their many intricacies, and country (no, I'm not kidding), and on an on.  That where I think he's more then the jazz idiom.  I think he approaches music as solo arrangements on guitar. 
I've often thought that the solo guitarist is pigeon-holed as a 'finger style player' if he does Chet things, a 'jazz guitarist' if he does standards, or a 'classical guitarist' if he focuses on classical arrangements.  The intersection of all these (and others) is where I would put Ted. 
This isn't meant to diss any of the posts or players mentioned, by the way.  But i've seen several posts recently where Bach has come up again, and a new member who is a 'classical guitarist,' and the labels just seem to be partially disguising the wonderful commonality that exists, and that Ted made us all aware of. Old Man River, on the album, is a great example of the film composer, meets Chet, meets . . . well whatever else you recognize in there.  I hope some of us are aspiring to the breadth of the music as well as the technicalities of the genres. 
End  of wandering rant . .
Leon
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