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lovemytele

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi guys,

     I was wondering how you analyze sharp chords (quickly).  Say for example... C#m7 where you want to name the m3rd.
.....should I just learn the theoretical scale of C#Major?  (C#,D#,E#,F#,G#,A#,B#) and get E by flatting the 3rd.....

...or do you visualize in Db....

Basically, should I learn my # scales.

Thanks,
Bob



PaulV

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,585
Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Bob,
I think in terms of intervals.  I know that E is a minor 3rd higher than a C#.
I visualize the guitar neck and can "see" all the intervals all over the neck.
Most of the notation I do for Ted's arrangements is done in my head, away from the guitar. 
It helps to know the fretboard backwards and forward, inside and out.
Lean the scales, but think intervals, or scale degrees.

I know this doesn't help much...but ya gotta put in the time.

__________________
--Paul
James

Registered:
Posts: 279
Reply with quote  #3 
The key of C# minor has four sharps.  It's relative to E major.

The key of C# major has seven sharps.  It's not theoretical.  To be theoretical, a key must have more than seven sharps (or more than seven flats).  Since there are only seven letter names for notes (A through G), normally the maximum number of sharps a key can have is seven.  But theoretical keys have more than seven in the sense that there's at least one double sharp (or double flat).  So the theoretical key of G# major has one double sharp (Fx) and the other six notes are single sharp notes.

Just learn the regular 15 major keys and the 15 minor keys.  Forget theoretical keys.  Properly named chords will pretty much always have roots from those keys.  Should you encounter something that appears to not be built from one of those roots, just flip everything enharmonically (i.e. use the equivalent flat for every sharp).  Or just slide the chord up or down by a half step and analyze that chord.  Once you've analyzed it, you can restore the root by moving it a half step back to where it came from.
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